HURRICANE HISTORY (1851-2010):

By: ncforecaster , 5:37 AM GMT on December 01, 2011

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Hey Everyone,

This particular blog entry is a complete and thorough accounting of all known North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (TC)-of at least tropical storm (TS) intensity-that developed during the period of 1851-2010, as contained in HURDAT.

What is HURDAT?

In simplest terms, HURDAT is the "official" hurricane database that contains a detailed record of all tropical storms (TS) and hurricanes (H) known to have developed somewhere within the North Atlantic basin-which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Carribean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico-for the period of 1851 to the present. It is also the official record for all landfalling tropical storms and hurricanes known to have impacted the United States (U.S.) coastlines, as well. This database was initially created in support of the Apollo Space program in the 1960's, and contained six-hourly positions and intensities for all TC's that had been documented up until that time (Jarvinen et al. 1984). Unfortunately, there were (and still are) many systematic and random errors within the database that needed to be corrected (Neumann, 1994). Another issue that needed to be addressed were biases contained in the database resulting from a greater understanding of TC's that had developed over the years, and the enhanced analysis techniques used by NHC forecasters (Landsea, 1993).

As a result, researchers with the Hurricane Research Division (HRD)-led by Chris Landsea- undertook the work to correct these "errors" through a project called: "The Atlantic Hurricane Database Re-analysis Project (HRP)."

The stated "objective" of the HRP can be found on the main page of its website here, and specifies the following: "The Atlantic Hurricane Database Re-analysis Project is an effort led by the Hurricane Research Division to extend and revise the OAR's North Atlantic hurricane database (or HURDAT). Going back to 1851 and revisiting storms in more recent years, information on tropical cyclones is revised using an enhanced collection of historical meteorological data in the context of today's scientific understanding of hurricane and analysis techniques."

The stated "Goal" of the HRP can also be found at the above link and entails the following: "The primary goal for this project is to provide an extended and corrected Atlantic hurricane database of individual tropical cyclone tracks and intensities for both the entire Atlantic basin as well as U.S. landfalling storms. This fits in well with the goals of NOAA and HRD to better understand variability of extreme events, such as tropical storms.

As result of these efforts, HURDAT has been extended back in time to 1851 (from its original starting point of 1886), and an extensive revision has been made to the database for all known TCs through the 1930 North Atlantic basin hurricane season, as of the time of this writing.

Limitations to the historical record:

Although the HRP has greatly improved the accuracy of HURDAT (and the associated historical record contained therein), there are some significant and inherent limitations that mitigate against a complete accounting of all TC's that have traversed the warm waters of the North Atlantic basin, as well as all TC's that have impacted the U.S. coastline, throughout this period of record.

As one might expect, the historical record is considered less complete as one goes back farther in time, especially for the period that preceded the introduction of organized aircraft reconnaissance and the installation of geostationary satellites into space. With the aforementioned in mind, let's take a brief overview of the inherent limitations-in respect to an accurate accounting of all Atlantic basin TC'S-that are entailed within the aforementioned period of record.

1851-1900:

During the second half of the 19th century-corresponding to the first fifty years of the historical record-the biggest impediment to an accurate accounting of the number (and intensity) of TC's, as well as those that made a U.S. landfall, was the lack of resources available to detect their existence (and their true intensity). Unlike today, there were no geostationary or polar orbiting satellites to locate storms out over the open waters of the Atlantic. Recon flights into TC's had yet to be initiated, so an accurate estimation of a particular TC's intensity was greatly inhibited (likely underestimated). There also weren't any radar detection capabilities during this period of time, either. As a result, weather observers of the time had to rely on the sporadic data collected by ships at sea and/or the few observation sites that were unfortunate enough to find themselves in the path of one of these menacing storms. Even then, further complications existed. Without the access of radio transmission (unavailable until 1905), weather observers had to wait until ships had returned to port in order to review their respective ship logs. Worse yet, many more ships were unable to survive their encounter with these tropical terrors and the data was lost forever, along with the men who had taken it. In short, the detection of tropical storms and hurricanes was essentially limited to those TCs that affected ships at sea and/or those that impacted a populated land area. In other words, if there wasn't someone in the area where a respective TC happened to traverse, there could be no record of its existence.

The latter case mentioned above is problematic since many areas of the U.S. coastline was still very much sparsely populated. Case in point, one of the most hurricane prone areas of the U.S. coastline-Miami, Fl.-wasn't incorporated until 1896. Making matters worse-as far as a complete documentation of all TC landfalls is concerned-a small hurricane (like hurricanes Andrew 0f 1992, Bret of 1999, and Charley of 2005) likely went undetected because of the confined area of damaging winds and the sparsity of the population along many areas of the U.S. coastline, during this period in time.

Taking all the aforementioned in to account, the researchers with the Hurricane Research Division estimate that the number of "missed" TC's (those likely unaccounted for in the historical record) ranged upwards of 6 per year, for the period of 1851-1885. With the increase in ship traffic and population increases along coastal areas, the estimation of "missed" TC's (per season) decreases to a range of up to 4 per year for the period of 1886-1900 (Landsea et al. 2004).

As stated by Landsea, et. al. (in the "Documentation for 1851-1910 Alterations and Additions to the HURDAT Database), "By no means should the tropical cyclone record over the Atlantic Ocean be considered complete for either the frequency or intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes for the years of 1851 to 1910."

The authors go on to say, "However, more accurate and complete information is available for landfalling tropical cyclones along much of the United States coastline." That being said, they also note the following: "Because of the lack of continuously populated coastal regions over this era, this record represents an incomplete listing of the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones that have impacted the United States".

1901-1950:

The first half of the 20th century-corresponding to the second fifty-year period of the historical record-saw significant technological advances and the advent of new resources that greatly enhanced the detection, observation, and forecasting of tropical cyclones.

The first significant milestone of this particular era began with the advent of radio transmission that originated in 1902. It allowed for direct ship to shore communications-which was impossible prior to this time-which enabled forecasters to gather the data in real-time and use it operationally. It wasn't too long before the first known observational weather report was made from a ship on December 3, 1905, and it has been an invaluable tool for forecasters and mariners alike, ever since (Neumann et al. 1999). Before this major technological advancement occurred, weather observers had no way of gathering data from, or about, any TCs that didn't have a direct impact on land. Ironically, there was a downfall to this new found ability to transmit real-time data to and/from ships at sea, in that ships now had the information necessary to intentionally avoid encountering these devastating storms. With that, there was a "modest decrease" in the number of ship observations during this particular period.

Another huge break-through in TC detection and observation took place on July 27, 1943. On that fateful day, Major Joesph Duckworth flew a "propeller-driven, single-engine North American AT-6 Texan trainer into the eye of a hurricane". When he returned to base, the stations weather officer asked Maj. Duckworth to take him along for a second penetration into the eye of the storm (53rd Weather Recon Fact Sheet). With these two historic flights, Maj. Duckworth helped pave the way for the countless reconnaissance missions that would follow. These reconnaissance flights, begun in the summer of 1944, have greatly improved the science of TC forecasting, and the importance of which, can hardly be overstated. On the other hand, regular reconnaissance (Recon) flights into TCs was still in its infancy, during the latter part of the period we are examining. In the beginning, military units were tasked to fly regular reconnaissance missions/tracks across the Atlantic between North America and Allied Western Europe-only during daylight hours-in order to detect the presence of TCs. This definitely helped improve the detection of some TCs, but many others were "missed" because they didn't track through the areas RECON fights were tasked to cover. Even when RECON did locate a storm, or were sent out to investigate the intensity of one, they were hesitant to fly into the eyewall (in order to get to the eye) of strong hurricanes. Consequently, a direct measurement of a TCs central pressure was somewhat rare during the first decade of aircraft reconnaissance flights. Regardless, the implementation of a formal program for regular aircraft reconnaissance missions to gather data on prospective TC's and determining the intensity of others, has proven to be one of the most important advances in the science of TC forecasting and observation.

In short, this period of record (1901-1950) saw an increased improvement in the detection, observation, and forecasting of TC's. The continued increase in population along coastal areas of the U.S.-during this period-also provided for a more accurate accounting of U.S. tropical cyclone landfalls. That being said, Landsea, et. al, stated the following in "A Reanalysis of the 1911-1920 Atlantic Hurricane database": "It is estimated that more than three tropical cyclone's a year were likely missed in the pre-geostationary satellite era between 1900 and 1965 (Landsea 2007)". It serves as a reminder of the limitations in TC detection, observation, and forecasting that existed throughout the era of 1901-1950.

1951-2000:

As noted in the previous section, an organized program for aircraft reconnaissance (RECON) flights began in 1944. From that time to the present, RECON flights have greatly improved the science of TC detection, forecasting, and observation. On the other hand, these RECON flights only covered about one-half of the North Atlantic, and were generally only flown into storms that had traversed areas west of 50W longitude. Consequently, it is highly likely that TC remaining in the far eastern Atlantic basin, went undetected prior to 1966.

Arguably, the single greatest technological advancement (in TC detection) began in April of 1960-with the launch of the very first experimental weather satellite into space. This monumental achievement paved the way for the subsequent launch of the very first geostationary satellite into space, just 6 1/2 years thereafter. Unlike the previous "Polar" orbiting satellite, the geostationary weather satellites provided weather forecasters with a complete view of the entire North Atlantic basin. As a result, TC "counts" are considered most reliable for the period beginning in 1966. Other technological advancements since that time-some of which will be discussed in the next section-have led hurricane researchers (such as Chris Landsea) to suggest that it is exceedingly likely that one additional TC per season, remains unaccounted for in the historical record, for the period of 1966-2000.

This period also saw other significant technological advancements. They include, but aren't limited to, the implementation of a coastal radar network in 1955, deployment of ocean data collecting buoys in the early 1970's, use of aircraft launched dropsondes beginning in the early 1970's, and the development of highly sophisticated computer models to help determine the forecast track and intensity of TC's. This particular period also saw the development of various other tools and techniques that were derived to help better understand, forecast, and track TCs. One such example is the Dvorak technique-developed in 1973-that is used to estimate the intensity of a TC based solely on visible and Infra-red satellite imagery.

In short, this period of record (1951-2000) saw a remarkable improvement in the detection, observation, and forecasting of TC's. Moreover, it also coincided with an era of explosive population growth along coastal sections of the U.S. Consequently, there is very little, if any doubt, about the accuracy of TC counts for the U.S. mainland, during this particular period of the historical record. As noted in the previous blog entry, Landsea, et. al. stated that "a little more than three tropical cyclone's a year were likely missed in the pre-geostationary satellite era between 1900 and 1965 (Landsea 2007)". For the period of time thereafter (1966-2000), Landsea, et. al. estimates that roughly one tropical cyclone (per season) remains unaccounted for in the historical record.

2001-2010:

Unlike the previous eras we've discussed, this particular era is considered to be the most accurate for both TC "counts" and storm intensity. In fact, technological advances during the past decade (corresponding to the first decade of the twenty-first century) have made it possible to detect all TC's that form anywhere within the entire Atlantic basin.

These new technological advances have provided hurricane forecasters with new tools and data sources that has led to continued improvement in the detection, observation, and forecasting of TC's. These "new tools and data sources" include Quikscat, the advanced microwave sounding unit, and the cyclone phase space analysis. Without these, it is estimated that one TC per season would've been "missed"-likely misidentified as an extra-tropical cyclone instead-during the past decade. Obviously, the same would be true for the entire historical record that preceded it.

In short, this period of record (2001-2010) saw a continued improvement in the detection, observation, and forecasting of TCs. Moreover, it also coincided with continued population growth along all coastal sections of the United States. Consequently, there is essentially very little doubt about the accuracy of both TC counts and storm intensity for the U.S. mainland, during this particular period of the historical record. That being said, there are still inherent limitations within the inexact science of TC forecasting that makes a precise estimation of the maximum sustained wind associated with individual landfalling hurricanes somewhat more ambiguous. Fortunately, this too continues to improve over time, as new technological tools and data sources continue to become available.

FASCINATING FACTS:

With all the aforementioned taken into consideration, let's take an extensive look at some of the most "fascinating facts" of the entire historical record for tropical cyclone activity throughout the North Atlantic basin.

1) Total number of tropical cyclones (includes Subtropical Storms): 1446 (an average of 9.04 per season).

2) Total number of hurricanes: 853 (an average of 5.31 per season).

3) Total number of "major" hurricanes: 308 (an average of 1.93 per season).

Note: One HURDAT list doesn't include H Carol of 1954 in its MH totals, while another one does. For this compilation, H Carol is accounted for in the total of MHs.

4) Total number of TC's by month:

a) September = 492
b) August = 366
c) October = 294
d) July = 110
e) June = 83
f) November = 65
g) May = 21
h) December = 10
i) April = 2
j) March = 1
k) February = 1
l) January = 1

Note: These statistics are reflective of the month in which TC's initially achieved TS or STS intensity.

5) Total number of H's by month:

a) September = 332
b) August = 225
c) October = 161
d) July = 54
e) November = 41
f) June = 32
g) May = 4
h) December = 4
i) March = 1
j) Others = 0

6) Total number of MH's by month:

a) September = 148
b) August = 87
c) October = 51
d) July = 10
e) November = 7
f) June = 4
g) May = 1
h) December = 0
i) Others = 0

7) Most intense TC recorded:

There are two different equations or meterological parameters that can be used to determine the strongest hurricane to make a U.S. landfall. One is based on a respective storms MSW, while the other focuses on its minimum central barometric pressure. That being said, a hurricanes lowest central pressure at landfall is typically used to categorize a listing of the "most intense" TCs to develop within a particular ocean basin. With that in mind, Storm #22 (hurricane Wilma) of October 19, 2005 is the "most intense" TC known to have traversed the Atlantic basin during the period of 1851-present. At peak intensity, it had a lowest central pressure reading of 882 mb.

The strongest known hurricanes to develop anywhere within the Atlantic basin-in terms of MSW-are hurricane Camille of August 17, 1969 and hurricane Allen of August 7, 1980. At peak intensity, each one of the aforementioned hurricanes generated a MSW of 190 mph.

8) Most TC's to form in one season: The 2005 H season produced 28 documented TC's of tropical storm and/or hurricane intensity.

9) Most hurricanes to develop in one season: The 2005 H season also produced the most TC's of hurricane intensity, with 15.

10) Most "major" hurricanes to develop in one season: The 1950 H season spawned the most TC's of MH intensity-during this period-with 8.

11) Total number of TC's to make a U.S. landfall: 575 (an average of 3.59 per season).

12) Total number of U.S. landfalling hurricanes: 285 (an average of 1.79 per season).

13) Total number of U.S. "major" landfalling hurricanes: 95 (an average of 0.60 per season).

14) Total number of U.S. landfalling TC's by month:

a) September = 200
b) August = 134
c) October = 109
d) June = 63
e) July = 53
f) November = 14
g) May = 8
h) December = 0
i) February = 1
j) Others = 0

Note: Storm #6 of 1885 (Sept./Oct.), Storm #2 of 1899, Storm #5 of 1933, Storm #3 of 1953, H Edna of 1954, H Elena of 1985, and H Dennis of 1999 each made a U.S. landfall and/or strike during two separate months, respectively.

15) Total number of U.S. landfalling H's by month:

a) September = 106
b) August = 78
c) October = 53
d) July = 26
e) June = 19
f) November = 3
g) May = 1
h) December = 0
i) Others = 0

16) Total number of U.S. landfalling MH's by month:

a) September = 44
b) August = 29
c) October = 16
d) July = 4
e) June = 2
f) November = 0
g) May = 0
h) December = 0
i) Others = 0

17) Most intense U.S. landfalling hurricane:

There are two different equations or meterological parameters that can be used to determine the strongest hurricane to make a U.S. landfall. One is based on a respective storms maximum sustained wind (MSW), while the other focuses on its minimum central barometric pressure. That being said, a hurricanes lowest central pressure at landfall is typically used to categorize a listing of the "most intense" TCs to strike the U.S. shoreline. With that in mind, Storm #2 (The Great Labor Day hurricane) of September 2, 1935 is the "most intense" TC known to have made a U.S. landfall. At landfall, it had a lowest central pressure reading of 892 mb.

The strongest known hurricane to make a U.S. landfall-relative to a storms MSW-is hurricane Camille of August 17, 1969. At landfall, it had a MSW of 190 mph.

18) Most TC's to strike the U.S. coastline in one season: The 1916, 2004, and 2005 H seasons each produced 9 TC's of tropical storm and/or hurricane intensity that made a direct strike on U.S. shores.

19) Most hurricanes to strike the U.S. coastline in one season: The 1886 H season produced the most U.S. landfalling TC's of hurricane intensity, with 7.

20) Most "major" hurricanes to strike the U.S. coastline in one season: The 2005 H season spawned 4 hurricanes that came ashore at MH intensity.

IMPORTANT NOTE: I will continue to provide additional "fascinating facts", relative to this particular era of hurricane history, as time permits. In the meantime, I hope each one of you have a great rest of the week!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony

References:

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91. ncforecaster
6:08 AM GMT on June 07, 2012
List of all North Atlantic basin Hurricane seasons:

This is an accurate listing of all known TC (TS and H) activity for the months of January through December for the period of 1851-2011. The numbers listed in parenthesis are the total number of TCs for the preceding months of (January-May)/June/July/August/September/October/N ovember/December.

28 = 2005 (0/2/5/5/5/7/3/1)
20 = 1933 (1/1/3/6/4/4/1/0)
19 = 1887 (2/1/2/2/3/6/1/2)
19 = 1995 (0/1/4/7/3/4/0/0)
19 = 2010 (0/1/1/4/8/5/0/0)
19 = 2011 (0/1/3/7/6/1/1/0)
18 = 1969 (0/0/1/5/6/5/1/0)
16 = 1936 (0/3/2/6/4/1/0/0)
16 = 2003 (1/1/2/3/4/3/0/2)
16 = 2008 (1/0/3/4/4/3/1/0)
15 = 1916 (1/0/3/4/3/3/1/0)
15 = 1932 (1/0/0/3/6/4/1/0)
15 = 2000 (0/0/0/4/7/4/0/0)
15 = 2001 (0/1/0/3/4/5/2/0)
15 = 2004 (0/0/0/8/4/2/1/0)
15 = 2007 (1/1/1/3/7/1/0/1)
14 = 1953 (1/0/0/3/4/4/1/1)
14 = 1990 (0/0/2/6/2/4/0/0)
14 = 1998 (0/0/1/4/6/2/1/0)
13 = 1901 (0/1/2/4/3/3/0/0)
13 = 1931 (0/1/1/2/4/2/3/0)
13 = 1934 (0/1/2/2/4/3/1/0)
13 = 1949 (0/0/0/3/7/2/1/0)
13 = 1950 (0/0/0/4/3/6/0/0)
13 = 1971 (0/0/1/4/6/1/1/0)
13 = 1984 (0/0/0/4/6/1/1/1)
13 = 1996 (0/1/2/4/2/3/1/0)
12 = 1878 (0/0/1/3/3/4/1/0)
12 = 1886 (0/3/1/3/2/3/0/0)
12 = 1893 (0/1/1/5/3/1/1/0)
12 = 1909 (0/3/1/4/2/1/1/0)
12 = 1955 (0/0/1/4/5/2/0/0)
12 = 1978 (1/0/1/4/3/3/0/0)
12 = 1981 (1/1/0/3/4/1/2/0)
12 = 1999 (0/1/0/4/3/3/1/0)
12 = 2002 (0/0/1/3/8/0/0/0)
11 = 1870 (0/0/1/1/3/6/0/0)
11 = 1880 (0/1/0/4/3/3/0/0)
11 = 1898 (0/0/0/2/6/3/0/0)
11 = 1906 (0/2/0/2/3/3/1/0)
11 = 1924 (0/1/1/2/4/2/1/0)
11 = 1926 (0/0/2/1/5/2/1/0)
11 = 1944 (0/0/3/2/4/2/0/0)
11 = 1945 (0/1/1/4/3/2/0/0)
11 = 1954 (0/1/1/2/4/1/1/1)
11 = 1959 (1/2/2/1/3/2/0/0)
11 = 1961 (0/0/1/0/6/2/2/0)
11 = 1964 (0/1/1/3/4/1/1/0)
11 = 1966 (0/1/4/1/4/0/1/0)
11 = 1974 (0/1/1/4/4/1/0/0)
11 = 1980 (0/0/0/3/5/1/2/0)
11 = 1985 (0/0/2/3/3/2/1/0)
11 = 1988 (0/0/0/3/6/1/1/0)
11 = 1989 (0/1/2/4/2/1/1/0)
10 = 1869 (0/0/0/3/5/2/0/0)
10 = 1891 (0/0/1/2/3/3/1/0)
10 = 1899 (0/1/1/2/1/4/1/0)
10 = 1903 (0/0/1/1/4/3/1/0)
10 = 1908 (2/0/2/1/3/2/0/0)
10 = 1942 (0/0/0/3/3/3/1/0)
10 = 1943 (0/0/1/2/4/3/0/0)
10 = 1958 (0/1/0/4/4/1/0/0)
10 = 1970 (1/0/1/3/3/2/0/0)
10 = 1976 (1/0/1/5/2/1/0/0)
10 = 2006 (0/1/2/3/4/0/0/0)
9 = 1863 (0/0/0/4/5/0/0/0)
9 = 1888 (0/1/1/2/2/1/2/0)
9 = 1889 (1/1/0/1/5/1/0/0)
9 = 1892 (0/1/0/1/4/3/0/0)
9 = 1923 (0/1/0/0/4/4/0/0)
9 = 1937 (0/0/1/2/6/0/0/0)
9 = 1947 (0/0/1/2/3/3/0/0)
9 = 1948 (1/0/1/2/3/1/1/0)
9 = 1951 (1/0/0/3/3/2/0/0)
9 = 1963 (0/0/0/2/5/2/0/0)
9 = 1975 (0/1/1/2/3/1/0/1)
9 = 1979 (0/1/2/3/2/1/0/0)
9 = 1997 (0/1/4/1/1/2/0/0)
9 = 2009 (0/0/0/4/2/2/1/0)

8 = 1859 (0/0/1/1/3/3/0/0)
8 = 1861 (0/0/1/2/2/2/1/0)
8 = 1877 (0/0/0/1/4/2/1/0)
8 = 1879 (0/0/0/4/0/3/1/0)
8 = 1935 (1/0/0/3/1/2/1/0)
8 = 1938 (0/0/0/3/1/3/1/0)

7 = 1896 (0/0/1/1/2/2/1/0)
7 = 1912 (0/1/1/0/2/2/1/0)
7 = 1921 (0/1/0/0/3/2/1/0)
7 = 1927 (0/0/0/1/3/2/1/0)
7 = 1972 (1/1/0/2/2/0/1/0)
7 = 1994 (0/0/1/2/2/0/2/0)

6 = 1862 (0/1/0/1/1/2/1/0)
6 = 1986 (0/2/0/1/2/0/1/0)

5 = 1902 (0/2/0/0/1/1/1/0)
5 = 1907 (0/1/0/0/2/1/1/0)
5 = 1919 (0/0/1/0/3/0/1/0)

4 = 1868 (0/0/0/0/1/3/0/0)
4 = 1925 (0/0/0/2/1/0/1/0)

Note: This will be an ongoing project to relist and categorize these H seasons by greatest number of seasonal storms and in order from January to December, accordingly (Pre-season/June/July/August/September/October/Nov ember/December).

Seasonal totals through November:

Note: These totals are listed in the following order (October/September/August/July/June/Preseason). The totals to the far left preceeding the equals sign is total number of November TS's


0 = 1853 (1/4/3/0/0/0) = 8
0 = 1871 (1/2/3/0/2/0) = 8
0 = 1885 (1/4/3/0/0/0) = 8
0 = 1940 (2/2/3/0/0/1) = 8
0 = 1957 (1/4/1/0/2/0) = 8
0 = 1967 (3/4/1/0/0/0) = 8
0 = 1968 (1/3/1/0/3/0) = 8
0 = 1973 (2/2/2/2/0/0) = 8
0 = 1991 (3/3/1/1/0/0) = 8
0 = 1993 (0/3/4/0/1/0) = 8

0 = 1860 (1/4/2/0/0/0) = 7
0 = 1865 (1/3/1/0/1/1) = 7
0 = 1866 (1/4/1/1/0/0) = 7
0 = 1874 (1/3/2/1/0/0) = 7
0 = 1881 (0/2/5/0/0/0) = 7
0 = 1894 (3/1/2/0/1/0) = 7
0 = 1900 (3/3/1/0/0/0) = 7
0 = 1952 (2/2/2/0/0/1) = 7
0 = 1956 (0/4/1/1/1/0) = 7
0 = 1960 (0/2/2/2/1/0) = 7
0 = 1987 (1/3/3/0/0/0) = 7

0 = 1851 (1/1/1/2/1/0) = 6
0 = 1856 (0/1/5/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1858 (1/3/1/0/1/0) = 6
0 = 1875 (2/3/1/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1882 (1/4/1/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1895 (3/1/2/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1897 (2/3/1/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1904 (3/2/0/0/1/0) = 6
0 = 1911 (1/2/3/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1913 (2/0/3/0/1/0) = 6
0 = 1915 (0/2/3/1/0/0) = 6
0 = 1918 (0/2/4/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1928 (1/3/2/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1941 (2/4/0/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1946 (2/1/1/1/1/0) = 6
0 = 1965 (1/2/2/0/1/0) = 6
0 = 1977 (2/3/1/0/0/0) = 6
0 = 1992 (1/4/1/0/0/0) = 6

0 = 1852 (1/3/1/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1854 (1/2/1/0/1/0) = 5
0 = 1855 (0/1/4/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1864 (1/1/1/2/0/0) = 5
0 = 1872 (1/2/1/1/0/0) = 5
0 = 1873 (0/3/1/0/1/0) = 5
0 = 1876 (1/4/0/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1905 (2/3/0/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1910 (1/2/2/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1920 (0/5/0/0/0/0) = 5
0 = 1922 (2/2/0/0/1/0) = 5
0 = 1929 (2/2/0/0/1/0) = 5
0 = 1939 (2/1/1/0/1/0) = 5
0 = 1982 (0/2/1/0/2/0) = 5

0 = 1857 (0/3/0/0/1/0) = 4
0 = 1883 (1/1/2/0/0/0) = 4
0 = 1884 (1/3/0/0/0/0) = 4
0 = 1890 (1/0/2/0/0/1) = 4
0 = 1917 (0/1/2/1/0/0) = 4
0 = 1962 (1/1/2/0/0/0) = 4
0 = 1983 (0/2/2/0/0/0) = 4

0 = 1930 (1/0/2/0/0/0) = 3

0 = 1914 (0/1/0/0/0/0) = 1

Note: These totals take into account all HURDAT revisions to include the 1930-1935 seasons.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
87. ncforecaster
5:51 AM GMT on May 27, 2012
UPDATE:

The HRD has completed its reanalysis work for the years of 1931-1935. Listed below are the revisions I need to make in order to account for these HURDAT changes.

1935:

1) New TS's added to HURDAT:

a) Storm #1 (May 15-19) 50 kt.
b) Storm #8 (Nov. 3-14) 40 kt.

2) Intensity changes to existing TC's:

a) Storm #2 (originally storm #1) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 115 kt. category four MH in Aug. (was a 105 mph category 3 MH).
b) Storm #3 (originally storm #2) reanalyzed to be upgraded to an even more intense category five (160 kt.) MH in Sept. (was originally a 140 kt. category 5 MH).
c) Storm #5 (originally storm #4) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 120 kt. category four MH in Sept. (was listed as a 105 kt. category 3 MH).
d) Storm #7 (originally storm #6) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 90 kt. category two H in Nov. (was a 70 kt. category 1 H).

3) Changes to U.S. TS's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for TS's:

5 9/29/1935* 0000Z 25.2 79.6 55 FL

* - Indicates that the tropical storm/hurricane center did not make a U.S. landfall, but did produce tropical storm force winds over land. Position indicated is point of closest approach. Maximum winds refer, in this table, to the strongest winds estimated for the United States.

Also: The removal and addition of TS's from HURDAT changed the respective Storm # of the original TS designations, as seen below.

b) My conservative estimate of original HURDAT U.S. TS landfalls:

13) Storm #4 1935 Sept 28 50 kt. (MH-offshore, SE Fl.)

Note: No change needed for U.S. TS totals.

4) Changes to U.S. H's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for U.S. H's:

3-9/3/1935 0200Z 24.8N 80.8W 160 5 5 892 1010 300 CFL5, BFL5 "Labor Day"
3-9/4/1935 2200Z 29.6N 83.4W 85 2 20 965 1012 350 AFL2, IGA1 "Labor Day"
7-11/4/1935 1800Z 25.9N 80.1W 85 2 10 973 1012 225 CFL2, BFL1 ---

b) Original HURDAT listings of U.S. H's:

1) 1935 Sep FL, SW5, NW2 5 892 ----- "Labor Day"
2) 1935 Nov FL, SE2 2 973 ----- -----

Note: No change needed for U.S. H totals.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
86. ncforecaster
8:12 AM GMT on May 21, 2012
UPDATE:

The HRD has completed its reanalysis work for the years of 1931-1935. Listed below are the revisions I need to make in order to account for these HURDAT changes.

1934:

1a) New TS's added to HURDAT:

a) Storm #2 (July 12-17) 80 kt. (Category 1 H)
b) Storm #6 (Sept. 1-4) 45 kt.
c) Storm #9 (Sept. 18-25) 50 Kt.

1b) TS's removed from HURDAT:

a) Storm #1 (May 27-31) 50 kt. (Was found to have been an extratropical cyclone throughout its lifetime).

2) Intensity changes to existing TC's:

a) Storm #13 (originally storm #11) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 100 kt. category three MH in Nov. (was a 75 kt. category 1 H).

3) Changes to U.S. TS's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for TS's:

6 9/3/1934 1000Z 35.0 76.2 40 NC
7 9/9/1934 0400Z 41.2 73.0 50 CT
11 10/6/1934 0100Z 30.3 87.4 45 FL

Note: The TS strike of Storm #7 took place after its H strikes on the NC, NJ, and NY coastlines.

Also: The removal and addition of TS's from HURDAT changed the respective Storm # of the original TS designations, as seen below.

b) My conservative estimate of original HURDAT U.S. TS landfalls:

1) Storm #1 1934 May 27 TS 40 (SW, Fl.)
1) Storm #1 1934 May 29 TS 50 (SC)
2) Storm #5 1934 Aug 27 TS 45 (H-offshore, N, TX.)
3) Storm #9 1934 Oct 5 TS 35 (Al.)

Note: Need to remove original Storm #1 from both the May and U.S. TS totals-it was an ET storm system. I need to add new Storm #6 to both the Sept. and U.S. TS totals.

4) Changes to U.S. H's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for U.S. H's:

1-6/16/1934 1900Z 29.7N 91.7W 85 1 30 966 1004 275 LA2 ---
3-7/25/1934 1700Z 28.1N 96.8W 75 1 25 979 1009 225 ATX1 ---
7-9/8/1934* 1000Z 35.3N 75.3W 65 1 --- 975 1014 200 NC1 ---
7-9/8/1934* 2200Z 39.7N 73.4W 65 1 --- 984 1017 200 NJ1 ---
7-9/9/1934 0200Z 40.7N 73.0W 65 1 --- 989 1018 200 NY1 ---

b) Original HURDAT listings of U.S. H's:

1) Storm #2 1934 Jun LA, 3 962
2) Storm #3 1934 Jul TX, S2 975

Note: Need to add Storm #7 (Originally Storm #6) to the totals for Sept. and U.S. H totals. I will also need to change the intensities of storm #1 (Originally storm #2) to category two (85 kt.) and Storm #3 to category one (75 kt.).

Very important note: I will continue to list the changes needed to the data I've compiled in this blog, as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
85. ncforecaster
5:35 AM GMT on May 18, 2012
UPDATE:

The HRD has completed its reanalysis work for the years of 1931-1935. Listed below are the revisions I need to make in order to account for these HURDAT changes.

1933:

1a) New TS's added to HURDAT:

a) Storm #4 (July 24-27) 50 kt.
b) Storm #15 (Sept. 24-28) 65 kt. (Category 1 H)


1b) TS's removed from HURDAT:

a) Storm #4 (July 21-27) 40 Kt. (Was found to be the same circulation of TS #3-rather than two separate TC's).
b) Storm #7 (Aug. 16-21) 35 kt. (was found to only be a TD on Aug. 14-20).
c) Storm #17 (Sept. 28-30) 35 kt. (was found to only be a TD on Sept. 27-30).

2) Intensity changes to existing TC's:

a) Storm #7 (originally storm #8) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 120 kt. category four MH in Aug. (was only listed as a 105 kt. category 3 MH).
b) Storm #10 (originally storm #11) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 140 kt. category five MH in Aug. (was a 110 kt. category 3 MH).
c) Storm #12 (originally storm #13) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 120 kt. category four MH in Sept. (was a 105 kt. category 3 MH).
d) Storm #13 (originally storm #14) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 95 kt. category two H in Sept. (was a 75 kt. category 1 H).
e) Storm #14 (originally storm #15) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 140 kt. category five MH in Sept. (was a 95 kt. category 2 H).
f) Storm #17 (Orginally storm #18) reanalyzed to be downgraded to a 110 kt. category three MH in Oct. (was listed as a 130 kt. category 4 MH).
g) Storm #18 (Orginally storm #19) reanalyzed to be downgraded to an 80 kt. category one H in Oct. (was an 85 kt. category 2 H).

3) Genesis changes to existing TS's:

a) Storm #16 (Oct. 1-4) reanalyzed to be an October TS (was late Sept. TS originally in HURDAT).

4) Changes to U.S. TS's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for TS's:

3 7/23/1933 0800Z 28.6 96.0 40 TX
11 9/5/1933 0400Z 29.2 82.9 55 FL
17 10/5/1933* 0800Z 24.4 80.6 55 FL

Note: The TS strike of Storm #11 took place after its MH landfall in SE Fl. on Sept. 4.

Also: The removal and addition of TS's from HURDAT changed the respective Storm # of the original TS designations, as seen below.

b) My conservative estimate of original HURDAT U.S. TS landfalls:

1) Storm #4 1933 July 23 TS 40 (C, TX.)
2) Storm #6 1933 Aug 20 TS 35 (NW, FL.) ?
3) Storm #18 1933 Oct 5 TS 60 (MH-offshore, S, FL.)

Note: Need to remove original Storm #6 from both the August and U.S. TS totals-it never quite achieved TS intensity.

5) Changes to U.S. H's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for U.S. H's:

5-7/30/1933 1600Z 27.1N 80.1W 65 1 --- 988 1018 150 CFL1 ---
5-8/5/1933# 0100Z 25.8N 97.2W 80 1 25 975 1010 200 ATX1 ---
7-8/23/1933 1000Z 35.8N 75.6W 80 1 40 963 1008 300 NC1,VA1,MD1 ---
10-9/5/1933 0400Z 26.1N 97.2W 110 3 20 940 1010 225 ATX3 ---
11-9/4/1933 0500Z 26.9N 80.1W 110 3 15 948 1013 175 CF3 ---
12-9/16/1933* 1200Z 35.2N 75.4W 85 1 40 952 1013 275 NC2,VA1 ---

b) Original HURDAT listings of U.S. H's:

1) Storm #5 1933 Jl-Au # TX, S2; FL, SE1 975
2) Storm #8 1933 Aug NC, 2; VA, 2 971
3) Storm #11 1933 Sep TX, S3 949
4) Storm #12 1933 Sep FL, SE3 948
5) Storm #13 1933 Sep NC, 3 957

Note: Need to change the U.S. H landfall intensities of storm #5 to category one (80 kt.), Storm #7 (orginally storm #8) to category one, and Storm #12 (Orginally storm #13) to category two hurricanes, respectively.

Very important note: I will continue to list the changes needed to the data I've compiled in this blog, as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
84. ncforecaster
8:50 PM GMT on May 06, 2012
UPDATE:

The HRD has completed its reanalysis work for the years of 1931-1935. Listed below are the revisions I need to make in order to account for these HURDAT changes.

1932:

1) New TS's added to HURDAT:

a) Storm #5 (Sept. 4-7) 60 kt.
b) Storm #7 (Sept. 16-26) 55 kt.
c) Storm #10 (Sept. 28-30) 40 kt.
d) Storm #13 (Oct. 18-21) 60 kt.

2) Intensity changes to existing TC's:

a) Storm #9 (originally storm #7) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 125 kt. category four MH in Sept. (was only listed as a 105 kt. category 3 MH).
b) Storm #14 (originally storm #10) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 150 kt. category five MH in Nov. (was a 115 kt. category 4 MH).

3) Changes to U.S. TS's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for TS's:

3 8/30/1932 0400Z 25.3 85.3 55 FL
4 9/9/1932* 0000Z 38.6 69.0 50 MA
6 9/15/1932 0400Z 30.0 83.9 50 FL
8 9/19/1932 1900Z 29.6 91.9 55 LA

Note: Storm #3 is accounted for in U.S. TS totals as it made a subsequent H landfall, as well.

b) My conservative estimate of original HURDAT U.S. TS landfalls:

1) Storm #4 1932 Sept 9 TS 40 (H-offshore, MA.)
2) Storm #5 1932 Sept 15/16 TS 40 (NW, Fl./NC)
3) Storm #6 1932 Sept 19 TS 35 (La.) ?
4) Storm #8 1932 Oct 15 TS 40 (La.)

Note: Need to remove Storm #11 (Originally storm #8, as shown above) from both the October and U.S. TS totals-it was ET at landfall.

4) Changes to U.S. H's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for U.S. H's:

2-8/14/1932 0400Z 29.0N 95.2W 130 4 10 935 1011 200 CTX4,BTX1 "Freeport"

3-9/01/1932 0500Z 30.2N 88.1W 75 1 --- 979 1009 200 AFL1,AL1,MS1 ---

b) Original HURDAT listings of U.S. H's:

1) Storm #2 1932 Aug TX, N4 941 "Freeport"
2) Storm #3 1932 Aug AL, 1 979

Note: Need to change the U.S. H landfall month of Storm #3 to Sept., from its current listing of August.

Very important note: I will continue to list the changes needed to the data I've compiled in this blog, as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
83. ncforecaster
6:19 AM GMT on May 06, 2012
UPDATE:

The HRD has completed its reanalysis work for the years of 1931-1935. Listed below are the revisions I need to make in order to account for these HURDAT changes.

1931:

1) New TS's added to HURDAT:

a) Storm #5 (Sept. 1-4) 35 kt.
b) Storm #9 (Oct. 13-16) 40 kt.
c) Storm #11 (Nov. 1-5) 50 kt.
d) Storm #12 (Nov. 11-16) 45 kt.

2) Intensity changes to existing TC's:

a) Storm #8 (originally storm #7) reanalyzed to be a 65 kt. H in Sept. (was only 35 kt. TS).
b) Storm #6 (originally storm #5) reanalyzed to be upgraded to a 115 kt. category four MH in Sept. (was 110 kt. category 3 MH).
c) Storm #7 (originally storm #6) reanalyzed to be downgraded to a 75 kt. H in Sept. (was listed as an 85 kt. category two H).

3) Changes to U.S. TS's:

a) Current HURDAT listings for TS's:

1 6/27/1931 2200Z 26.6 97.3 40 TX
2 7/15/1931 1000Z 29.2 91.0 50 LA

b) My conservative estimate of original HURDAT U.S. TS landfalls:

1) Storm #1 1931 June 28 TS 35 kt.(S, TX.)
2) Storm #2 1931 July 15 TS 45 (La.)

Note: No change needed for U.S. TS totals.

4) Changes to U.S. H's:

a) None. No U.S. hurricanes recorded.

Very important note: I will continue to list the changes needed to the data I've compiled in this blog, as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
82. ncforecaster
6:44 AM GMT on March 25, 2012
Important Update:

Hey everyone,

Due to some personal circumstances that will require my full attention in the short term, I probably won't have time to continue the current HURDAT research that I've undertaken since November 2010.

The revised and updated version of the Atlantic Basin Hurricane FAQ (Blake, et. al) appears to be far more accurate than the previous version (2007), but there are still some discrepancies between some of the monthly TC totals contained therein and those I have identified in my own very detailed and exhaustive accounting/listing of HURDAT TC's, for the period of 1851-2010.

When time once again permits itself, I will focus my efforts on re-verifying the totals I have listed in this particular blog entry and making sure they are entirely accurate-which they should be.

For those of you who have taken the time to follow this ongoing research endeavor, I want to thank you for your interest, encouragement, and for taking the time to read my blogs and posts.

Most important of all, I want to wish each and every one of you (each individual person who reads this particular message), a very healthy and prosperous rest of the weekend, month, and year!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
81. ncforecaster
3:25 AM GMT on March 21, 2012
All 2011 U.S. Hurricane Landfalls:

1) 9-8/27/2011 1200Z 34.7N 76.6W 75 Kt. 1 --- 952 ---- --- NC1 Irene

All 2011 U.S. Tropical Storm Landfalls:

1) 9 8/28/2011 0935Z 39.4 74.4 60 Kt. NJ Irene
1) 9 8/28/2011 1300Z 40.6 74.0 55 NY Irene
2) 13 9/4/2011 1030Z 29.6 92.1 40 LA Lee


Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
80. ncforecaster
2:52 AM GMT on March 12, 2012
2011 Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season:

A) All TS formations:

Note: The dates shown only account for the time that each specific storm first obtained TS intensity and the last time it retained TS intensity, respectively.

1) TS Arlene (6/29/11-6/30/11) Max intensity: 55 Kt.
2) TS Bret (7/17/11-7/21/11) Max intensity: 60 Kt.
3) TS Cindy (7/20/11-7/22/11) Max intensity: 60 Kt.
4) TS Don (7/27/11-7/30/11) Max intensity: 45 Kt.
5) TS Emily (8/1/11-8/7/11) Max intensity: 45 Kt.
6) TS Franklin (8/13/11-8/13/11) Max intensity: 40 Kt.
7) TS Gert (8/14/11-8/16/11) Max intensity: 55 Kt.
8) TS Harvey (8/19/11-8/21/11) Max intensity: 55 Kt.
9) MH Irene (8/20/11-8/28/11) Max intensity: 105 Kt.
10) TS Jose (8/27/11-8/28/11) Max intensity: 40 Kt.
11) MH Katia (8/29/11-9/10/11) Max intensity: 120 Kt.
12) TS Unnamed (9/1/11-9/2/11) Max intensity: 40 Kt.
Special notation: Became TD at 8 pm on Aug. 31.
13) TS Lee (9/2/11-9/5/11) Max intensity: 50 Kt.
14) H Maria (9/6/11-9/16/11) Max intensity: 70 Kt.
15) H Nate (9/7/11-9/11/11) Max intensity: 65 Kt.
16) MH Ophelia (9/20/11-10/3/11) Max intensity: 120 Kt.
17) H Philippe (9/24/11-10/8/11) Max intensity: 80 Kt.
18) MH Rina (10/23/11-10/28/11) Max intensity: 100 Kt.
19) TS Sean (11/8/11-11/11/11) Max intensity: 55 Kt.

Totals: 19 TS/7 H/4 MH

B) All Hurricane Formations:

1) MH Irene: Became H at 2 am EDT on August 22. Became MH at 8 am EDT on Aug. 24.
2) MH Katia: Became H at 8 pm EDT on August 31 (9/1/11/00 UTC). Became MH at 8 am EDT on Sept. 5.
3) H Maria: Became H at 2 pm EDT on Sept. 15.
4) H Nate: Became H at 2 pm EDT on Sept. 8.
5) MH Ophelia: Became H at 1 pm EST on Sept. 29. Became MH at 1 pm EST on Sept. 30.
6) H Philippe (Sept. TC): Became H at 7 pm EST on Oct. 3.
7) MH Rina: Became H at 1 pm EST on Oct. 24. Became MH at 1 pm EST on Oct. 25.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
79. ncforecaster
4:36 AM GMT on March 04, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1961-1970 (Continued from comment #51):

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

4) Storm #4 1962 Oct 7 1400Z 40 Kt. (ME) H Daisy-passes offshore, but still delivers wind gusts of 70 mph to the coastal areas of central Maine.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 21 0000Z 35 Kt. (Va.) H Ginny-passes offshore, but delivers minimal TS-force winds to the beaches of SE Virginia.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 24 1200Z 35 Kt. (NE Fl.) H Ginny-offshore of NE Fl., where it brings TS-force winds to Jacksonville.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 25 0600Z 40 Kt. (Ga.) H Ginny-offshore of Ga.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 25 1200Z 45 Kt. (SC) H Ginny-offshore, but still brings 47 mph sustained winds to Ocean Drive Beach.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 26 1000Z 60 Kt. (NC) H Ginny-brings sustained winds of 70 mph to the Oak Island C.G. station, as it passes offshore.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 29 1000Z 40 Kt. (NY) H Ginny-passes offshore, but delivers 61 mph wind gusts to Montauk Point.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 29 1100Z 35 Kt. (CT.) H Ginny-passes offshore, but delivers minimal TS-force winds to the beaches of eastern Connecticut.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 29 1100Z 35 Kt. (RI) H Ginny-passes offshore, but delivers 55 mph wind gusts to Block Island.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 29 1200Z 55 Kt. (MA) H Ginny-delivers sustained winds of 65 mph to Nantucket, as it passes offshore.
5) Storm #8 1963 Oct 29 1500Z 55 Kt. (ME) H Ginny-passes offshore, but delivers 100 mph wind gusts to Rockland.
6) Storm #3 1964 Aug 7 2100Z 55 Kt. (C TX.) Abby
7) Storm #1 1965 June 15 TS 45 (NW Fl.)
8) Storm #4 1967 Sept. 16 TS 45 Kt. (H Doria-offshore, MD, DE)
8) Storm #4 1967 Sept. 16 TS (Doria) 45 (Va.)
8) Storm #4 1967 Sept. 16/17 TS (Doria) 35 (NC)
9) Storm #1 1968 June 4 TS (Abby) 45 (SW Fl.)
9) Storm #1 1968 June 4 TS (Abby) 40 (SE Fl.)
9) Storm #1 1968 June 5 TS (Abby) 45 (NE Fl.)
9) Storm #1 1968 June 6/7 TS (Abby) 40 (Ga., SC)
10) Storm #3 1968 June 23 TS (Candy) 55 (C TX.)
11) Storm #13 1969 Oct 2 TS 40 (SW Fl.)
12) Storm #2 1970 July 22 TS (Becky) 35 (NW Fl.)
13) Storm #7 1970 Sept 15/16 TS (Felice) 50 (N TX.)
14) Storm #8 1970 Sept 27 35/40 (TS Greta-offshore of extreme S Fl.)

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
78. ncforecaster
6:04 AM GMT on March 02, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling H's (1961-1965-):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1851-1930. 1983-2010).

1) Storm #3 1961 Sept 11 1025Z 45 KT. (La.) MH Carla-offshore to the SW of Cameron, La.
1) Storm #3 1961 Sept 13 1030Z 35 KT. (OK) Carla-passes into central Oklahoma as a minimal TS (Inland).
2) Storm #4 1963 Sept 17 1000Z 35 KT. (La.) H Cindy-brings wind gusts estimated at 60 mph to Grand Chenier.
3) Storm #5 1964 Aug 28 1200Z 55 Kt. (NE Fl.) Cleo-moving NNW to N through NE Fl. as a weakening TS (Inland).
3) Storm #5 1964 Aug 29 1000Z 40 Kt. (Ga.) Cleo-Landfall near Savannah.
3) Storm #5 1964 Aug 29 1000Z 40 Kt. (SC) Cleo-Landfall near Savannah-brings TS-force winds to southern beaches of SC.
4) Storm #6 1964 Sept 10 0200Z 60-65 Kt. (Ga.) H Dora-It is estimated that sustained winds of hurricane-force may have battered the extreme SE portion of the Georgia coastline.
4) Storm #6 1964 Sept 12 2130Z 40 Kt. (NW Fl.) Dora-brings sustained winds of 44 mph to Tampa, as she is due north of the area, and moving through eastern Georgia as a TS (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1964 Sept 12 2018Z 45 Kt. (SC) Dora-Charleston recorded sustained winds of 47 mph as TS Dora was moving ENE through eastern Georgia, on its way into and through eastern SC (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1964 Sept 13 1200Z 45 Kt. (NC) Dora-moves into and through eastern-most NC as a 45 Kt. TS (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1964 Sept 13 1231Z 50 Kt. (Va.) Dora-Cape Henry recorded sustained winds of 65 mph, as TS Dora was moving into SE NC (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
77. ncforecaster
8:16 AM GMT on February 22, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling H's (1976-1982):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1851-1930. 1983-2010).

1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 9 0958Z 40 KT. (NC) MH Belle-offshore to the SSE of the NC Outer Banks.
1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 9 1700Z 50 KT. (MD) H Belle-offshore to the ESE of Ocean City, Maryland.
1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 9 2200Z 40 Kt. (NJ) H Belle-passing offshore to the SSE.
1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 10 0400Z 50 Kt. (CT) H Belle-located to the S of Bridgeport, Connecticut on its way to landfall on Long Island, NY, and subsequently into CT. as a TS.
1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 10 0303Z 40 Kt. (RI) H Belle-located to the SW of Providence, Rhode Island.
1) Storm #3 1976 Aug 10 0700Z 35 Kt. (MA) H Belle-located to the WSW of Gloucester.
2) Storm #2 1979 July 11 1000Z 35 Kt. (MS) H Bob-just offshore of SE Louisiana to the SW of Bay St. Louis, MS.
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 5 0447Z 45 Kt. (NC) H David-located to the WSW of eastern NC as a weakening H (Inland).
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 5 1900Z 40 Kt. (Va.) David-moves into and through central Virginia as a minimal TS (Inland).
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 6 0128Z 35 Kt. (DE) David-located to the WSW of Delaware, as it moves through central Virginia (Inland).
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 6 0600Z 35 Kt. (MD) David-Passes through extreme NW Maryland as a minimal TS (Inland).
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 6 1100Z 35 Kt. (NJ) David-brings wind gusts exceeding 50 mph to New Jersey, as it moves through central Pennsylvania (Inland).
3) Storm #4 1979 Sept 6 1100Z 35 Kt. (NY) David-delivers 55 mph wind gusts to New York City,, as it moves through central Pennsylvania (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1979 Sept 12 1338Z 45 Kt. (La.) MH Frederic-delivers 48 mph sustained winds to Boothville in extreme SE La., while located to the SE, as it moved toward a subsequent landfall on the northern Gulf Coast.
4) Storm #6 1979 Sept 12 1845Z 60 Kt. (NW Fl.) MH Frederic-delivers 98 mph wind gusts to the Pensacola, Fl. NAS, as it moves toward landfall near the Al./MS. border.
4) Storm #6 1979 Sept 14 0000Z 40 Kt. (TN) Frederic-moves into and through central Tennessee as a minimal TS (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1979 Sept 14 0600Z 35 Kt. (KY) Frederic-moves into and through eastern Kentucky as a minimal TS (Inland).
4) Storm #6 1979 Sept 14 1000Z 35 Kt. (WV) Frederic-moves into the western-most portion of West Virginia as a minimal TS (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
76. ncforecaster
7:23 AM GMT on February 20, 2012
Quoting SPLbeater:
Evenin ncforecaster...havin a good week? Been a week or 2 since i stopped in here to observe your work....lol.


Hi SPL,

Thank you so much for stopping by and checking in-it is greatly appreciated!:) I have been extremely busy with work and some personal circumstances that have required my full attention the past week or so. That being said, I will continue to work on identifying additional tropical storm impacts (those not currently listed as TS strikes in HURDAT) for various U.S. States, as time permits.

I hope life has been treating you well, and I will look forward to talking with you again very soon!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
75. ncforecaster
7:12 AM GMT on February 20, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling H's (1971-1975):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1851-1930. 1983-2010).

1) Storm #6 1971 Sept 16 0443Z 35 KT. (N TX.) H Edith-passes offshore to the S and E of upper Texas coast.
1) Storm #6 1971 Sept 16 1230Z 40 KT. (MS) H Edith-makes landfall in SW Louisiana and moves into, and through, the inland portions of central Mississippi as a TS.
2) Storm #8 1971 Sept 30 0935Z 40 KT. (Va.) H Ginger-located to the SSE of SE Virginia, on its way to landfall near Morehead City, NC.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 20 0000Z 35 KT. (Ga.) Agnes-moves into SW Georgia as a weakening TS (Inland).
3) Storm #2 1972 June 21 2158Z 35 KT. (NC) Agnes-reintensifies into a TS as it moves through the NC Outer Banks (Inland).
3) Storm #2 1972 June 21 2317Z 40 KT. (DC) Agnes-located to the SSW, over the NC Outer Banks (Inland).
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 0037Z 40 KT. (Va.) Agnes-located offshore to the SE.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 0730Z 45 KT. (MD) Agnes-located offshore to the SE.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 0928Z 45 KT. (DE) Agnes-located offshore to the SE.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 1500Z 40 KT. (NJ) Agnes-located offshore to the SE.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 2000Z 50 KT. (NY) Agnes-Makes landfall in western Long Island, NY, and passes very near New York City.
3) Storm #2 1972 June 22 1100Z 35 KT. (CT) Agnes-offshore to the south as a strong TS.
4) Storm #5 1975 Sept 22 2245Z 40 Kt. (La.) H Eloise-offshore to the S.
4) Storm #5 1975 Sept 23 0000Z 35 Kt. (MS) H Eloise-offshore to the S.
4) Storm #5 1975 Sept 23 1455Z 35 Kt. (TN) H Eloise-Inland in south Alabama as a weakening H. Also, moves into eastern-most Tennessee as a minimal TS.
4) Storm #5 1975 Sept 23 1500Z 45 Kt. (Ga.) H Eloise-moving through east-central Alabama as a weakening hurricane (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
74. SPLbeater
3:58 AM GMT on February 08, 2012
Evenin ncforecaster...havin a good week? Been a week or 2 since i stopped in here to observe your work....lol.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
73. ncforecaster
11:39 PM GMT on February 06, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

55) Storm #9 2009 Nov 10 0736Z 40 Kt. (MS) Ida-offshore of the Northern Gulf Coast as a strong TS.
56) Storm #5 2010 Sept 3 1245Z 40 Kt. (Va.) H Earl-passes offshore as a very large category one hurricane.
56) Storm #5 2010 Sept 4 0623Z 35 Kt. (MA) H Earl-passes offshore as a very large category one hurricane.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
72. ncforecaster
2:39 AM GMT on February 01, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

49) Storm #1 2006 June 14 0000Z 35 Kt. (Ga.) Alberto-Moves into southern Georgia as a minimal TS (Inland).
50) Storm #6 2006 Sept 1 1153Z 35 Kt. (Va.) Ernesto-brought TS-force sustained winds to Norfolk, Va. before it weakened to TD status around 1200Z. The higher winds that occurred thereafter (along the coasts of Va., MD, and DE), were the result of a tightening pressure gradient between the low pressure of Ernesto (that soon became extratropical) and a strong High Pressure system to the north (Inland).
51) Storm #5 2008 Aug 5 0848Z 50 Kt. (La.) Edouard-brought TS-force winds to the SW Louisiana coastline as it passed by to the south on its way to landfall in SE Texas.
52) Storm #7 2008 Aug 31 0336Z 40 Kt. (SW Fl.) MH Gustav-Passing to the SW of Key West, Fl. as it treks through the Gulf of Mexico towards a SE La. landfall.
52) Storm #7 2008 Sept 1 0930Z 45 Kt. (AL) H Gustav-Passing to the SW of the western-most Alabama shoreline as it heads towards a SE La. landfall.
52) Storm #7 2008 Sept 1 1442Z 50 Kt. (MS) H Gustav-Passing to the SW of the western Mississippi shoreline as it moves through SE La. (Inland).
52) Storm #7 2008 Sept 1 2136Z 35 Kt. (TX) H Gustav-Passing ENE of the eastern-most Texas shoreline (right at the TX/La. border) as it continues to move through south-central La. (Inland).
53) Storm #8 2008 Sept 6 1636Z 40 Kt. (Va.) Hanna-passes just to the west of SE Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula of Va. as a moderate TS (Inland).
53) Storm #8 2008 Sept 6 2200Z 35 Kt. (MD) Hanna-passes over the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland as a moderate TS (Inland).
53) Storm #8 2008 Sept 6 2200Z 35 Kt. (DE) Hanna-passes over the Delmarva Peninsula of Delaware as a moderate TS (Inland).
53) Storm #8 2008 Sept 7 0047Z 35 Kt. (NJ) Hanna-passes over the eastern-most coastline of New Jersey as a moderate TS (Inland).
54) Storm #9 2008 Sept 9 1747Z 45 Kt. (SW Fl.) H Ike
54) Storm #9 2008 Sept 11 1550Z 35 Kt. (Al.) H Ike
54) Storm #9 2008 Sept 12 1236Z 35 Kt. (MS) H Ike
54) Storm #9 2008 Sept 14 0037Z 40 Kt. (AK) Ike
54) Storm #9 2008 Sept 14 0030Z 35 Kt. (OK) Ike

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
71. ncforecaster
12:14 AM GMT on January 31, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

43) Storm #3 2005 July 6 1217Z 40 Kt. (Al.) Cindy-passing just west of SW Alabama as a moderate TS (Inland).
44) Storm #4 2005 July 10 2210Z 35 Kt. (La.) H Dennis-Lake Pontchartrain records 34 Kt. sustained winds as H Dennis continues to move through the inland portions of SW Alabama (Inland).
44) Storm #4 2005 July 11 0024Z 35 Kt. (MS) Dennis-moving through inland SW Alabama as a strong TS on its way to moving into east-central Mississippi as a minimal TS (Inland).
45) Storm #11 2005 Aug 29 1452Z 50 Kt. (NW Fl.) MH Katrina-Pensacola, Fl. records 49 Kt. sustained winds as MH Katrina makes its third U.S. landfall at the La./MS border.
45) Storm #11 2005 Aug 30 0220Z 35 Kt. (AK) Katrina-brings sustained TS-force winds to extreme SW Arkansas while moving NNE through east-central Mississippi (Inland).
45) Storm #11 2005 Aug 30 0505Z 35 Kt. (TN) Katrina-moving NNE through northeastern Mississippi as a 40 Kt. TS, on its way into SW Tennessee as a minimal TS (Inland).
46) Storm #15 2005 Sept 8 1520Z 35 Kt. (NE Fl.) H Ophelia-moving erratically offshore of the east-central coastline of the Florida Peninsula.
47) Storm #17 2005 Sept 23 1952Z 40 Kt. (MS) MH Rita-brings sustained TS-force winds to the central and western sections of the Mississippi coastline as MH Rita passes offshore to the SW.
47) Storm #17 2005 Sept 24 1728Z 35 Kt. (AK) Rita-moves into extreme SW Arkansas as a minimal TS (Inland).
48) Storm #20 2005 Oct 5 2300Z 45 Kt. (Ga.) Tammy-Makes landfall at the Fl./Ga. border as a 45 Kt. TS and moves through southern Georgia as a weakening TS. Fort Pulaski measured 38 Kt. sustained winds at 0200Z on Oct 6.

Honorable mention: H Rita brought wind gusts exceeding TS-force to extreme SW Oklahoma around 0030Z on September 24, 2005 as it was about to move into SW Arkansas as a weakening TS.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
70. ncforecaster
8:52 PM GMT on January 29, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 18 2024Z 50 Kt. (DE) Isabel-passing to the SSW of the Delmarva peninsula of Delaware as a weakening hurricane over North-eastern NC (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0200Z 35 Kt. (DC) Isabel-moving through central Virginia as a strong TS to the SW of DC (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0355Z 50 Kt. (MD) Isabel-passes to the SW of Maryland as a strong TS (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0206Z 45 Kt. (NJ) Isabel-passes to the SW of New Jersey as a strong TS (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0600Z 40 Kt. (WV) Isabel-moves through NE West Virginia as a weakening TS (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0517Z 40 Kt. (PA) Isabel-moves into SW Pa. as a weakening, but still strong TS (Inland).
36) Storm #9 2003 Sept 19 0736Z 35 Kt. (NY) Isabel-passes to the SW of New York as a weakening, but still strong TS (Inland).
37) Storm #3 2004 Aug 14 2210Z 35 Kt. (Va.) Charley-just SW of SE Virginia as a moderate TS (Inland).
38) Storm #6 2004 Sept 6 1942Z 40 Kt. (Ga.) Frances-moves into SW Georgia as a moderate TS (Inland).
39) Storm #7 2004 Aug 30 0412Z 35 Kt. (NC) Gaston-moves into SE NC as a weakening TS (Inland).
39) Storm #7 2004 Aug 31 0142Z 40 Kt. (Va.) Gaston-reintensifies back into a TS as it moves through SE Virginia (Inland).
40) Storm #9 2004 Sept 16 0206Z 45 Kt. (La.) MH Ivan-passes offshore of SE La. as a MH on its way to landfall near Gulf Shores, Al.
40) Storm #9 2004 Sept 16 0245Z 50 Kt. (MS) MH Ivan-offshore to the SE of the Mississippi coastline on its way to landfall near Gulf Shores, Al.
40) Storm #9 2004 Sept 17 0306Z 35 Kt. (Ga.) Ivan-Delivered 61 Kt. wind gusts to Helen, Ga. (Inland).
41) Storm #10 2004 Sept 27 0119Z 35 Kt. (Ga.) Jeanne-moves NNW through NW Fl. as a moderate TS (Inland).
42) Storm #1 2005 June 11 1900Z 35 Kt. (Al.) Arlene-makes landfall just east of the Al./Fl. border.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
69. ncforecaster
10:51 PM GMT on January 28, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

30) Storm #8 2000 Sept 23 1902Z 35 Kt. (NC) Helene-brings TS-force winds to the northern NC Outer Banks as it reintensifies into TS intensity near the NC/Va. border (Inland).
31) Storm #1 2001 June 11 0854Z 35 Kt. (La.) STS Allison-intensifies into a Subtropical Storm over SE La. (Inland).
31) Storm #1 2001 June 11 1040Z 35 Kt. (MS) STS Allison-moves through SE Mississippi as a Subtropical Storm (Inland).
32) Storm #8 2002 Sept 14 1500Z 50 Kt. (MS/AL) Hanna-Already shown on HURDAT TS list, but needs to be ammended as a landfall for MS/AL, instead of the current listing of LA/MS for its second U.S. landfall.
32) Storm #8 2002 Sept 14 1352Z 50 Kt. (NW Fl.) Hanna-Pensacola, Fl. measured the peak official sustained winds with TS Hanna as it was about to come ashore at the MS/AL border.
33) Storm #9 2002 Sept 26 1200Z 45 Kt. (MS) Isidore-comes ashore in SE La. and moves just west of the La./MS border as a strong TS.
33) Storm #9 2002 Sept 26 1226Z 45 Kt. (AL) Isidore-Brings officially measured sustained winds of 42 Kt. at Mobile as Isidore continued to move N through SE La. (Inland).
33) Storm #9 2002 Sept 26 1221Z 35 Kt. (NW Fl.) Isidore-Brings officially measured sustained winds of 35 Kt. at Destin as Isidore continued to move N through SE La. (Inland).
34) Storm #12 2002 Oct 4 0740Z 35 Kt. (AK) Lili-brings TS-force sustained winds to extreme SW Arkansas (Inland).
34) Storm #12 2002 Oct 4 0740Z 35 Kt. (MS) Lili-brings TS-force sustained winds to west-central Mississippi (Inland).
35) Storm #2 2003 July 1 0054Z 40 Kt. (MS) Bill-brings TS-force sustained winds to the western coastal sections of Mississippi (Gulfport) as it moves up through SE La. (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
68. ncforecaster
9:20 AM GMT on January 26, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 15 0820Z 50 Kt. (NE Fl.) MH Floyd-offshore to the ESE of the Florida east coast as a major hurricane.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 15 1804Z 40 Kt. (Ga.) MH Floyd-offshore to the ESE of the Georgia east coast as a major hurricane.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 0150Z 55 Kt. (SC) MH Floyd-offshore to the E of the SC east coast as a major hurricane.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 1355Z 50 Kt. (Va.) H Floyd-moves over the extreme coastal sections of Virginia as a minimal hurricane.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 2040Z 45 Kt. (MD) Floyd-moves over the eastern-most Delmarva peninsula of Maryland as a strong TS.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 2130Z 45 Kt. (DE) Floyd-moves over the eastern-most Delmarva peninsula of Delaware as a strong TS.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 2351Z 40 Kt. (NJ) Floyd-moves over the eastern-most coastal sections of New Jersey as a weakening TS (Inland).
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 2136Z 35 Kt. (PA) Floyd-moves up from the SSW and passes just east of Pa. (Inland).
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 16 2245Z 40 Kt. (NY) Floyd-moves over Long Island, N.Y. as a moderate TS.
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 17 0300Z 50 Kt. (MA) Floyd-moves through MA as a moderate TS (Inland).
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 17 0145Z 35 Kt. (CT) Floyd-moves through CT as a weakening TS (Inland).
28) Storm #6 1999 Sept 17 0300Z 35 Kt. (RI) Floyd-passes just to the W of Rhode Island as a weakening TS (Inland).
29) Storm #9 1999 Oct 17 0303Z 35 Kt. (Ga.) H Irene-offshore to the SW of St. Simon's Island as an intensifying hurricane.
29) Storm #9 1999 Oct 17 2215Z 35 Kt. (NC) H Irene-offshore to the SW of the NC Outer Banks as an intensifying hurricane.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
67. ncforecaster
8:18 AM GMT on January 25, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010)

23) Storm #5 1997 July 20 0216Z 45 Kt. (NW Fl.) Danny-just west of the Florida Panhandle (in extreme SE Al.) as a strong TS.
23) Storm #5 1997 July 24 1846Z 45 Kt. (NC) Danny-located at the NC/Va. border (just inland) about to move back over the water.
23) Storm #5 1997 July 24 2055Z 45 Kt. (Va.) Danny-offshore to the SE of the Delmarva peninsula of Va.
23) Storm #5 1997 July 25 2020Z 40 Kt. (MA) Danny-offshore to the SE of Nantucket Island, MA.
24) Storm #2 1998 Aug 26 1715Z 40 Kt. (SC) MH Bonnie-offshore to the ESE of NE SC.
24) Storm #2 1998 Aug 28 0300Z 60 Kt. (Va.) H Bonnie-offshore to the SSE of the Delmarva Pennisula of Va.
25) Storm #5 1998 Sept 3 1200Z 45 Kt. (Ga.) Earl-moved into SW Ga. as a weakening TS (Inland).
26) Storm #7 1998 Sept 27 2240Z 50 Kt. (Al.) H Georges-offshore to the S of the Al. coast.
26) Storm #7 1998 Sept 28 1020Z 45 Kt. (La.) H Georges-offshore to the east of extreme SE La. about an hour before coming ashore in Mississippi.
26) Storm #7 1998 Sept 28 0642Z 50 Kt. (NW Fl.) H Georges-offshore to the SW of the NW Florida coastline on its way to landfall in SE Mississippi.
27) Storm #4 1999 Aug 30 2030Z 60 Kt. (NC) H Dennis-offshore to the ESE of the NC Outer Banks as a category two hurricane.
27) Storm #4 1999 Sept 4 2232Z 45 Kt. (Va.) TS Dennis-Located to the SSW over the Morehead City area of NC, after coming ashore as a strong TS about an hour and a half earlier (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
66. ncforecaster
10:46 AM GMT on January 24, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

21) Storm #2 1996 July 12 1500Z 50 Kt. (SC) H Bertha-offshore to the ESE a few hours prior to "Bertha" making landfall in SE N.C.
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 0600Z 60 Kt. (Va.) Bertha-moves into and through eastern coastal areas as a strong TS (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1200Z 40 Kt. (MD) Bertha-passes over eastern-most coastal Maryland as a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1335Z 40 Kt. (DE) Bertha-passes over coastal Delaware as a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1410Z 40 Kt. (NJ) Bertha-passes over coastal New Jersey as a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1530Z 35 Kt. (Pa.) Bertha-passes over the south eastern-most portion of Pennsylvania as a a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1530Z 50 Kt. (NY) Bertha-passes over western Long Island as a strong TS.
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 1800Z 45 Kt. (CT) Bertha-passes over Connecticut as a strong TS, with strongest winds over Rhode Island and the offshore waters.
21) Storm #2 1996 July 14 0010Z 50 Kt. (RI) Bertha-passes over western Rhode Island as a strong TS.
21) Storm #2 1996 July 13 2030Z 45 Kt. (MA) Bertha-passes through central Massachusetts as a strong TS.
21) Storm #2 1996 July 14 0200Z 35 Kt. (NH) Bertha-passes over eastern-most coastal New Hampshire as a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
21) Storm #2 1996 July 14 0700Z 35 Kt. (ME) Bertha-passes over eastern-most coastal Maine as a strong TS, with strongest winds remaining over the water (Inland).
22) Storm #6 1996 Sept 5 2215Z 50 Kt. (SC) MH Fran-offshore of NE SC to the ESE, just a few hours prior to "Fran" coming ashore in SE N.C.
22) Storm #6 1996 Sept 6 0805Z 40 Kt. (Va.) Fran-moves into central Virginia as a weakening TS (Inland).

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
65. ncforecaster
1:00 PM GMT on January 23, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

13) Storm #2 1991 Aug 19 0446Z 55 Kt. (NC) H Bob-offshore
13) Storm #2 1991 Aug 19 1015Z 35 Kt. (MD) MH Bob-offshore
13) Storm #2 1991 Aug 19 1100Z 35 Kt. (DE) MH Bob-offshore
13) Storm #2 1991 Aug 19 1245Z 40 Kt. (NJ) MH Bob-offshore
13) Storm #2 1991 Aug 19 2200Z 40 Kt. (NH) H Bob-offshore.
14) Storm #2 1992 Aug 26 2300Z 40 Kt. (MS) Andrew-passes into SW Mississippi as a minimal TS (Inland).
15) Storm #5 1992 Sept 25 0000Z 40 Kt. (NC) Danielle-offshore
15) Storm #5 1992 Sept 25 2300Z 45 Kt. (MD) Danielle-Landfall on the Delmarva Pennisula and passes through MD.
15) Storm #5 1992 Sept 25 2300Z 45 Kt. (DE) Danielle-Landfall on the Delmarva Pennisula.
15) Storm #5 1992 Sept 26 0800Z 35 Kt. (Pa.) Danielle-passes into eastern Pa. as a minimal TS (Inland).
16) Storm #2 1994 Aug 16 1000Z 35 Kt. (Ga.) Beryl-passes into extreme SW Ga. as a minimal TS (Inland)
17) Storm #7 1994 Nov 18 0800Z 40 Kt. (NC) H Gordon-offshore of Outer Banks
18) Storm #1 1995 June 6 1900Z 40 Kt. 1994 (Ga.) Allison-passes into south-central Ga. as a minimal TS (Inland).
19) Storm #5 1995 Aug 3 1830Z 65 Kt. (Al.) H Erin-passes into SE Al. as a weakening and minimal hurricane after coming ashore in the extreme western Fl. Panhandle about 2 1/2 hours earlier (Inland).
19) Storm #5 1995 Aug 4 0000Z 45 Kt. (MS) Erin-passes into SE Mississippi as a weakening TS (Inland).
20) Storm #15 1995 Oct 4 1700Z 50 Kt. (La.) MH Opal-brings hurricane-force wind gusts to extreme SE Louisiana as it passes to the ESE.
20) Storm #15 1995 Oct 4 1956Z 35 Kt. (MS) MH Opal-brings minimal TS-force winds to the coast of SE Mississippi just a couple of hours before it comes ashore in the western Panhandle of Fl.
20) Storm #15 1995 Oct 5 0555Z 40 Kt. (Ga.) Opal-brings TS-force winds to Georgia, as it moves through east-central Alabama as a strong TS (Inland).
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
64. ncforecaster
8:00 AM GMT on January 23, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

8) Storm #3 1986 August 17 2300Z 50 Kt. (Va.) H Charley-offshore
8) Storm #3 1986 August 18 1030Z 45 Kt. (MD) H Charley-offshore
8) Storm #3 1986 August 18 1100Z 45 Kt. (DE) H Charley-offshore
8) Storm #3 1986 August 18 1200Z 35 Kt. (NJ) H Charley-offshore (???)
8) Storm #3 1986 August 19 0530Z 50 Kt. (MA) H Charley-offshore.
9) Storm #3 1988 August 28 1500Z 35 Kt. (SC) Chris-Landfall at Ga./SC border (Inland)
10) Storm #7 1988 Sept 10 0730Z 40 Kt. (MS) H Florence-Landfall in SE La.
10) Storm #7 1988 Sept 9 2330Z 35 Kt. (Al.) H Florence-offshore to the SSW just prior to landfall in SE La.
11) Storm #3 1989 Aug 1 1200Z 40 KT. (La.) H Chantal-Landfall in N TX.
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 0400Z 40 KT. (Ga.) H Hugo-Landfall in SC.
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 1300Z 45 KT. (TN) Hugo-Passes through extreme NE TN. as a strong TS (Inland)
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 1400Z 50 KT. (Va.) Hugo-Passes through western Va. as a strong TS (Inland)
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 1600Z 45 KT. (WV) Hugo-Passes through WV as a TS (Inland)
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 1900Z 35 KT. (OH) Hugo-Passes through eastern Ohio as a minimal TS (Inland)
12) Storm #8 1989 Sept 22 2000Z 35 KT. (PA) Hugo-Passes through eastern-most Pa. as minimal TS (Inland), and was on the eastern side of Hugo as it tracked into/through eastern-most Ohio.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
63. ncforecaster
12:56 PM GMT on January 22, 2012
List of additional TS impacts from landfalling TS's and H's (1983-2010):

Note: These are TS impacts/strikes in areas/states that aren't currently accounted for on the HURDAT list of U.S. TS strikes (1983-2010).

1) Storm #5 1984 Sept 10 0110Z 35 KT. (NE Fl.) H Diana-offshore
1) Storm #5 1984 Sept 13 1550Z 40 Kt. (SC) H Diana-Landfall in SE NC
2) Storm #2 1985 July 25 1400Z 40 Kt. (NC) Bob-Inland in NC
3) Storm #5 1985 Sept 2 1800Z 60 Kt. (La.) Elena-Inland in La.
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept. 27 0950Z 60 Kt. (Va.) H Gloria-offshore
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 1400Z 40 Kt. (MD.) H Gloria-offshore
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 1600Z 40 Kt. (DE) H Gloria-offshore
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 1633Z 45 Kt. (NJ) H Gloria-offshore
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 1850Z 50 Kt. (RI) H Gloria-passed to the W (Inland)
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 2300Z 60 Kt. (ME) H Gloria-Inland in ME.
4) Storm #7 1985 Sept 27 1700Z 75 Kt. (CT) H Gloria Landfall
5) Storm #10 1985 Oct 30 1700Z 35 Kt. (N TX.) H Juan-offshore to the S and E.
5) Storm #10 1985 Oct 31 1700Z 55 Kt. (NW Fl.) Juan-crosses into the western-most Fl. Panhandle as a strong TS, with landfall coming at the Al./Fl. border.
6) Storm #11 1985 Nov 22 1400Z 45 Kt. (SC) Kate-Inland
6) Storm #11 1985 Nov 22 1800Z 40 Kt. (NC) Kate-Inland
7) Storm #2 1986 June 26 0900Z 50 Kt. (La.) Bonnie-Landfall in N TX.

Very Important Note: This will be a very time consuming and tedious project that will likely take quite some time to complete. That being said, I will continue to update this list as time permits.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
61. ncforecaster
6:56 AM GMT on January 21, 2012
List of all U.S. Tropical Storm Impacts from a Landfalling U.S. Hurricane (1851-1930 & 1983-2010):

1) 3 9/16/1858* 0300Z 35.2 75.2 50 NC
2) 8 11/ 1/1861$ 0800Z 26.0 81.8 60 FL
2) 8 11/ 3/1861 0800Z 41.0 72.3 60 NY
2) 8 11/ 3/1861 0900Z 41.2 72.0 50 CT
3) 3 8/23/1871 0000Z 31.2 81.4 60 GA
4) 2 9/16/1876$* 1500Z 25.5 79.7 40 FL
5) 5 9/ 7/1878$ 2100Z 24.7 80.9 60 FL
5) 5 9/ 8/1878$ 0200Z 25.2 81.0 60 FL
6) 11 10/22/1878$* 0000Z 25.9 79.8 50 FL
7) 6 9/ 8/1880 1600Z 29.8 83.6 50 FL
8) 5 8/18/1886*$ 0100Z 23.9 81.9 55 FL
9) 6 9/26/1888& 1300Z 41.6 69.9 55 MA
10) 7 10/11/1888 1600Z 33.9 78.1 60 NC
11) 6 9/23/1889 1300Z 30.3 87.7 60 FL
12) 4 9/28/1894 1200Z 34.7 76.7 60 NC
13) 2 9/10/1897$& 1800Z 24.4 81.9 50 FL
14) 1 8/2/1898$ 0300Z 27.1 80.1 60 FL
15) 2 7/30/1899$ 1000Z 24.9 80.6 40 FL
16) 3 8/13/1899* 1200Z 27.0 78.6 60 FL
17) 3 7/12/1901 2200Z 34.0 77.9 35 NC
18) 4 8/10/1901 2200Z 26.3 80.1 40 FL
19) 4 10/20/1904 1000Z 25.5 81.2 35 FL
20) 8 10/21/1906 0900Z 30.0 81.4 50 FL
21) 2 5/29/1908& 2100Z 35.2 75.6 55 NC
21) 2 5/30/1908 2300Z 41.3 72.0 35 CT
22) 1 8/10/1928 0400Z 30.0 84.3 35 FL

23) 2-7/23/1985 1200Z 26.4 82.3 40 FL Bob
24) 10-10/31/1985 1000Z 29.2 89.5 60 LA Juan
24) 10-10/31/1985 1700Z 30.2 87.8 55 AL Juan
25) 2 8/20/1991 0130Z 44.1 69.1 60 ME Bob
26) 6 9/6/2004 1800Z 30.1 84.0 50 FL Frances
27) 3 7/6/2005 0900Z 30.2 89.5 45 MS Cindy
28) 17 9/21/2005* 0000Z 24.1 82.7 55 FL Rita

This list shows that there were at least 28 U.S. landfalling hurricanes that brought TS-force winds to at least one other area or State in the U.S., during the aforementioned period of record.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
60. ncforecaster
10:01 AM GMT on January 20, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1991-2010:

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

1) 5-9/25/1992 1200Z 35.9 75.2 55 KT. VA Danielle
2) 1-6/20/1993 0900Z 27.1 97.4 35 TX Arlene
3) 1-7/3/1994 1500Z 30.4 86.5 55 FL Alberto
4) 2-8/16/1994 0000Z 30.0 85.6 50 FL Beryl
5) 7-11/15/1994 1300Z 24.6 81.7 45 FL Gordon
5) 7-11/16/1994 1300Z 26.5 81.9 45 FL Gordon
6) 1-6/5/1995 1400Z 29.9 84.4 60 FL Allison
6) 1-6/5/1995 1500Z 30.1 84.2 55 FL Allison
7) 4-7/31/1995 0200Z 29.2 95.3 40 TX Dean
8) 10-8/23/1995 1800Z 27.0 80.2 35 FL Jerry
9) 1-6/20/1996 0000Z 34.7 76.4 35 NC Arthur
10) 5-9/2/1996* 1200Z 40.5 68.3 55 MA Edouard
11) 10-10/8/1996 0330Z 30.0 83.9 60 FL Josephine
12) 3-8/22/1998 1000Z 27.8 97.1 40 TX Charley
13) 6-9/11/1998 0600Z 28.2 96.9 45 TX Frances
14) 8-9/20/1998 0500Z 29.1 90.9 35 LA Hermine
15) 13-11/5/1998 1100Z 26.2 81.9 55 FL Mitch
16) 4-9/4/1999 2100Z 34.8 76.5 60 NC Dennis
17) 8-9/21/1999 1700Z 25.9 81.7 50 FL Harvey
18) 7-9/18/2000 0300Z 29.3 83.2 55 FL Gordon
19) 8-9/22/2000 1200Z 30.5 86.6 35 FL Helene
20) 1-6/5/2001 2100Z 28.9 95.3 45 TX Allison
21) 2-8/6/2001 0500Z 30.4 86.3 60 FL Barry
22) 7-9/14/2001 1200Z 27.1 82.6 60 FL Gabrielle
23) 13-11/5/2001* 0600Z 23.1 79.7 35 FL Michelle
24) 2-8/5/2002 0200Z 29.4 89.3 35 LA Bertha
25) 5-9/3/2002 1200Z 30.4 78.4 35 FL Edouard
26) 6-9/7/2002 0900Z 28.5 96.3 50 TX Fay
27) 7-9/11/2002* 0000Z 35.5 74.7 45 NC Gustav
28) 8-9/14/2002 0800z 29.1 89.1 50 LA Hanna
28) 8-9/14/2002 1500Z 30.4 88.4 50 LA/MS Hanna
29) 9-9/26/2002 0600Z 29.1 90.3 55 LA Isidore
30) 11-10/11/2002 1700Z 33.0 79.5 35 SC Kyle
30) 11-10/11/2002 2200Z 33.9 78.4 35 NC Kyle
31) 2-6/30/2003 1900Z 29.3 91.0 50 LA Bill
32) 5-8/16/2003# 0600Z 25.6 96.2 35 TX Erika
33) 7-8/31/2003 1100Z 29.0 95.1 35 TX Grace
34) 2-8/12/2004 1400Z 29.6 85.1 40 FL Bonnie
35) 8-8/31/2004 0600Z 41.5 70.9 35 MA Hermine
36) 13-10/10/2004 1100Z 29.2 91.0 35 LA Matthew
37) 1-6/11/2005 1900Z 30.3 87.5 50 FL Arlene
38) 5-7/20/2005# 1200Z 24.8 97.6 45 TX Emily
39) 20-10/5/2005 2300Z 30.4 81.4 45 FL Tammy
40) 1-6/13/2006 1630Z 29.9 83.7 40 FL Alberto
41) 3-7/21/2006 0600Z 41.0 70.5 45 MA Beryl
42) 6-8/30/2006 0300Z 24.9 80.6 40 FL Ernesto
42) 6-8/30/2006 0500Z 25.2 80.7 40 FL Ernesto
42) 6-9/1/2006 0340Z 33.9 78.1 60 NC Ernesto
43) 1-5/10/2007* 1200Z 30.1 79.9 35 GA Andrea
44) 2-6/2/2007* 0600Z 25.1 84.6 35 FL Barry
45) 7-9/9/2007 1530Z 34.8 76.4 50 NC Gabrielle
46) 5-8/5/2008 1200Z 29.6 94.2 55 TX Edouard
47) 6-8/18/2008 2030Z 24.5 81.8 50 FL Fay
47) 6-8/19/2008 0845Z 25.9 81.6 55 FL Fay
47) 6-8/21/2008 1900Z 29.3 81.1 55 FL Fay
47) 6-8/23/2008 0615Z 29.8 84.7 45 FL Fay
48) 8-9/6/2008 0720Z 33.8 78.7 60 NC/SC Hanna
49) 3-8/17/2009 0530Z 30.4 86.5 40 FL Claudette
50) 9-11-10/2009* 0000Z 28.9 88.7 50 LA Ida
51) 1-7/1/2010# 0000Z 24.3 97.3 40 TX Alex
52) 2-7/23/2010 1430Z 25.4 80.2 35 FL Bonnie
53) 5-9/3/2010* 1100Z 35.8 73.5 60 NC Earl
54) 8-9/7/2010# 0600Z 26.2 97.7 50 TX Hermine

Notes:

# - Indicates that the tropical storm made landfall over Mexico, but
produced tropical storm force winds over Texas. The time and position given
are that of the Mexican landfall. The strongest winds impacted Mexico. Thus the
winds indicated here (for Texas) are lower than in HURDAT and are lower than they
were over Mexico.

* - Indicates that the tropical storm/hurricane center did not make a U.S.
landfall, but did produce tropical storm force winds over land. Position
indicated is point of closest approach. Maximum winds refer, in this table,
to the strongest winds estimated for the United States.

& - Indicates that the tropical storm/hurricane center did make a direct
landfall, but that the strongest winds likely remained offshore. Thus the
winds indicated here are lower than in HURDAT.

Source: HRD U.S. TS List

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
56. ncforecaster
8:05 AM GMT on January 19, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1978-1990:

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

14) Storm #5 1978 Aug 29 0030Z 50 Kt. (La.) Debra.
15) Storm #3 1979 July 24 1800Z 45 Kt. (TX./La.) Claudette.
16) Storm #5 1979 Sept 1 1300Z 35 Kt. (C TX.) Elena.
17) Storm #4 1980 Sept 5 2100Z 45 Kt. (N TX.) Danielle.

1) Storm #2 1981 July 1 TD/TS (Bret) 30-35 KT. (MD.) ?
2) Storm #4 1981 Aug 17 0000Z-0000Z Aug 19 35 Kt. (SW, SE Fl.) Dennis
2) Storm #4 1981 Aug 20 1115Z 40 Kt. (NC) Dennis
2) Storm #4 1981 Aug 20 1200Z 35 Kt. (NJ) Dennis-offshore to the south.
3) Storm #1 1982 June 3 2126Z 35 Kt. (SW Fl.) H Alberto-offshore to the WSW of Key West, Fl.
4) Storm #2 1982 June 18 1400Z 35 Kt. (NW, NE Fl.) STS
4) Storm #2 1982 June 19 0200Z 35 Kt. (NC) STS
5) Storm #4 1982 Sept 11 1200Z 55 Kt. (La./N TX.) Chris

? = Based on the fact that neither the Monthly Weather Review (MWR) or the Tropical Cyclone Report (TCR) shows any gale-force or TS-force winds on land for the tropical storm landfall/strike of Bret of 1981, it is highly likely that it won't be retained as a TS strike for the U.S., once reanalysis is complete.

HRD Tropical Storm List (1983-1990):

6) 2-8/28/1983 1800Z 25.4 97.5 40 KT. TX Barry
7) 4-9/30/1983 1200Z 37.4 75.7 40 VA Dean
8) 9-9/27/1984 1400Z 26.7 80.0 50 FL Isidore
9) 8-9/24/1985 2100Z 40.8 72.5 35 NY Henri
10) 9-10/10/1985 2100z 30.6 81.4 35 FL Isabel
11) 1-8/10/1987 0600Z 29.6 94.5 40 TX Unnamed
12) 2-8/09/1988 0600Z 29.6 89.5 45 LA Beryl
13) 3-8/28/1988 1500Z 32.0 80.9 40 GA Chris
14) 7-9/17/1988# 0000Z 24.4 98.2 60 TX Gilbert
15) 12-11/23/1988 0700Z 27.3 82.6 55 FL Keith
16) 1-6/26/1989 1300Z 28.7 95.7 40 TX Allison
17) 13 10/11/1990* 0600Z 26.7 82.6 60 FL Marco

Notes:

# - Indicates that the tropical storm made landfall over Mexico, but
produced tropical storm force winds over Texas. The time and position given
are that of the Mexican landfall. The strongest winds impacted Mexico. Thus the
winds indicated here (for Texas) are lower than in HURDAT and are lower than they
were over Mexico.

* - Indicates that the tropical storm/hurricane center did not make a U.S.
landfall, but did produce tropical storm force winds over land. Position
indicated is point of closest approach. Maximum winds refer, in this table,
to the strongest winds estimated for the United States.

& - Indicates that the tropical storm/hurricane center did make a direct
landfall, but that the strongest winds likely remained offshore. Thus the
winds indicated here are lower than in HURDAT.

Source: HRD U.S. TS List
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
55. SPLbeater
9:54 PM GMT on January 18, 2012
Quoting ncforecaster:


Hi SPL,

I appreciate the very kind words and for taking the time to read and post in my blog!:)

Back in November of 2010, I decided that I wanted to gather the most accurate compilation of North Atlantic basin tropical cyclone history possible. I was inspired to do so when I was unable to locate various historical data (such as a list of all tropical storm landfalls for the U.S.) anywhere on the web, and that which I did find, wasn't as accurate as one would expect.

Since that time to the present, much of my own free time has been devoted to this research. It is most definitely a very tedious and time-consuming endeavor, but one I truly enjoy and one that should keep me busy for quite some time.

Thanks again for your thoughtful post, and I hope you have a great rest of the night!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony


Well the best thing for u doing this is that it keeps you busy and entertained:D I will probably come to this blog for a historical hurricane event if i cant find it online
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
54. ncforecaster
5:48 AM GMT on January 18, 2012
Quoting SPLbeater:



dude...how much time do you spend on this stuff? I have just got to applaud you for your persistence!


Hi SPL,

I appreciate the very kind words and for taking the time to read and post in my blog!:)

Back in November of 2010, I decided that I wanted to gather the most accurate compilation of North Atlantic basin tropical cyclone history possible. I was inspired to do so when I was unable to locate various historical data (such as a list of all tropical storm landfalls for the U.S.) anywhere on the web, and that which I did find, wasn't as accurate as one would expect.

Since that time to the present, much of my own free time has been devoted to this research. It is most definitely a very tedious and time-consuming endeavor, but one I truly enjoy and one that should keep me busy for quite some time.

Thanks again for your thoughtful post, and I hope you have a great rest of the night!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
53. SPLbeater
3:02 AM GMT on January 18, 2012
Quoting ncforecaster:
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1971-1980

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 TS (Doria) 50-55 kt. (NC)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 TS (Doria) 50 (Va.)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 TS (Doria) 35 (MD)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 45 (Pa.)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 40 (NJ)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 40 (NY)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 35 (CT)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 40 (MA)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 40 (RI)
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 TS (Doria) 35 (ME)
2) Storm #9 1971 Sept 14 TS (Heidi) 35 (ME) ??

3) Storm #1 1972 May (STS Alpha)
4) Storm #4 1972 Sept (TS Carrie)

5) Storm #5 1973 Sept (TS Delia)

6) Storm #1 1974 June (STS)

7) Storm #3 1975 Aug (Caroline-I)

8) Storm #1 1976 May (STS)
9) Storm #5 1976 Aug (TS Dottie)
10) Storm #8 1976 Sept (STS)

11) Storm #2 1978 July (TS Amelia)
12) Storm #5 1978 Aug (TS Debra)

13) Storm #3 1979 July (TS Claudette)
14) Storm #5 1979 Sept (TS Elena)

15) Storm #4 1980 Sept (TS Danielle)

? = signifies a higher degree of uncertainty regarding the prescribed intensity for these particular storms. Furthermore, the Monthly Weather Review (MWR) doesn't list any gale-force or TS-force winds for the tropical storm landfalls shown in HURDAT (or isn't retained in HURDAT preliminary reanalysis) for

?? = TS Heidi became ET before it reached the coast of Maine. Consequently, it's very likely that this particular storm won't be retained as a TS landfall in HURDAT, once reanalysis is complete.

* = Designates a TS or H that made landfall in NE Mexico, but still brought TS conditions to south TX.

Very Important Note: I am currently in the process of adding the approximate landfall intensity (and localities) for each respective TS strike that I have identified to have impacted some portion of the U.S. coastline with TS-force sustained winds, during the period of 1931-1982. Please note that I have already listed each one of these TS strikes in the decadal listing of all TS and H strikes that can be found in earlier posts contained in this particular blog entry.




dude...how much time do you spend on this stuff? I have just got to applaud you for your persistence!
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
52. ncforecaster
12:50 AM GMT on January 18, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1971-1980

1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 1600Z 55 Kt. (NC) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 1837Z 50 Kt. (Va.) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 27 2210Z 35 KT. (MD) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 0145Z 40 KT. (NJ) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 0355Z 45 KT. (PA) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 0415Z 40 Kt. (NY) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 0645Z 35 KT. (CT) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 0738Z 40 KT. (RI) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 1018Z 40 KT. (MA) Doria.
1) Storm #5 1971 Aug 28 1500Z 35 KT. (ME) Doria.
2) Storm #9 1971 Sept 14 35 Kt. (ME) Heidi-becomes ET before crossing coastline of ME. ??
3) Storm #1 1972 May 27 45 Kt. (Ga.) STS Alpha.
4) Storm #4 1972 Sept 3 35 Kt. (MA) Carrie-offshore. ??
5) Storm #5 1972 Sept 8/9 35 Kt. (NC) Dawn-offshore of NC Outer Banks.
6) Storm #5 1973 Sept 4-6 60 Kt. (C, N TX.) Delia.
7) Storm #1 1974 June 25 0800Z-1300Z 45-50 Kt. (SW Fl., NE Fl.) STS.
8) Storm #3 1975 Aug 30 1642Z 40 Kt. (S TX.) MH Caroline. *
9) Storm #1 1976 May 23 35-40 Kt. (NW Fl., NE Fl., Ga.) STS
10) Storm #5 1976 Aug 19 1400Z-2000Z 40 Kt. (SW Fl, SE Fl.) Dottie.
10) Storm #5 1976 Aug 20 2200Z 35 Kt. (SC) Dottie.
11) Storm #8 1976 Sept 14/15 40 Kt. (SC) STS
12) Storm #1 1977 Sept 2 0600Z 35 Kt. (S TX.) MH Anita. * ?
13) Storm #2 1978 July 31 0000Z 45 Kt. (S TX.) Amelia.


? = The Monthly Weather Review (MWR) doesn't list any gale-force or TS-force winds for the tropical storm landfalls/strikes shown in HURDAT for TS Dawn of 1972 and MH Anita of 1977. As a result, it's unclear whether or not these two particular storms will be considered TS strikes for the U.S. coastline once reanalysis is complete.

?? = TS Heidi of 1971 became ET before it reached the coast of Maine. Consequently, it's very likely that this particular storm won't be retained as a TS landfall in HURDAT, once reanalysis is complete. The same seems to be the case for TS Carrie of 1972, although it brought hurricane-force wind gusts to portions of the Northeast (as an ET storm system).

* = Designates a TS or H that made landfall in NE Mexico, but still brought TS conditions to south TX.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
51. ncforecaster
10:52 AM GMT on January 16, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1961-1970:

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 20 1200Z 40 Kt. (NC) MH Esther-offshore of the NC Outer Banks.
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 21 0544Z 40 Kt. (NJ) MH Esther-passes offshore and delivers a peak wind gust of 69 mph to Atlantic City.
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 21 0900Z 60-70 Kt. ? (NY) MH Esther-passes offshore of Long Island, but still delivers peak wind gusts of 100 mph to the Fire Island CG station. &
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 21 0500Z 45 Kt. (CT) MH Esther-offshore to the S of CT.
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 21 0500Z 55 KT. (RI) MH Esther-offshore to the S of Block Island, RI, where wind gusts of 83 mph were recorded.
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 21 1200Z 55 Kt. (MA) MH Esther-offshore to the SSW of Cape Cod, where wind gusts exceeded hurricane force.
1) Storm #5 1961 Sept 26 1000Z 35 Kt. (ME) Esther-makes landfall along the central Maine coastline as a weakening TS.
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 14 1400Z 35 Kt. (NC) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 0600Z 35 Kt. (NY) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 0900Z 45 (RI) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 0900Z 45 (CT) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 1000Z 45 (MA) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 1000Z 45 (NH) Unnamed TS
2) Storm #6 1961 Sept 15 1100Z 55 Kt. (ME) Unnamed TS
3) Storm #1 1962 Aug 28 1200Z 35 Kt. (NC) H Alma-brought wind gusts of 53 mph to Nags Head, as it passed just offshore of the Outer Banks, as a minimal hurricane.
3) Storm #1 1962 Aug 29 1200Z 40 Kt. (MA) H Alma-brought wind gusts to 60 mph to the coastal areas of Massachusetts, as it passed offshore.
3) Storm #1 1962 Aug 29 1200Z 40 Kt. (RI) H Alma-brought wind gusts to 60 mph to the coastal areas of Rhode Island, as it passed offshore.

Very Important Note: This list is continued in comment #79 above.

& = Storm #5 of 1961 (MH Esther) may have delivered hurricane-force sustained winds to portions of Long Island, NY during the early morning hours of September 21-where wind gusts were officially estimated at 100-108 mph (according to the MWR).
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
50. SPLbeater
7:20 PM GMT on January 15, 2012
Quoting ncforecaster:


Hi SPL,

It's very difficult to make a definitive choice as to which "Atlantic" hurricane was the worst, per sey. In this case, I presume you are referring to the worst U.S. hurricane landfall, as opposed to the worst hurricane experienced anywhere within the Atlantic basin.

With the aforementioned in mind, there are various parameters one might use to categorize the "worst" storm. Based on intensity alone, it has to be the 1935 Great Labor Day hurricane (GLDH). If it's wind speed, one could make a reasonable argument for Camille, as well as the GLDH. If one uses total number of U.S. deaths, it has to be the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900. If it's based upon the largest known storm surge on a U.S. coastline, Katrina currently holds that record, with Camille a close second.

Even with the aforementioned parameters taken into consideration, one has to remember that some areas (such as the Mississippi coastal areas) are more prone to a large storm surge than others. These are just a few reasons as to why labeling one particular hurricane as the "worst" is so difficult and somewhat subjective.

In any respect, there is very little doubt that both H Camille and Katrina each deserve the distinction as being one of the "worst" U.S. hurricane landfalling storms of all time.

Thanks so much for the excellent post, and I hope you have a wonderful rest of the weekend!:)


k thx for ur view. seems like nothing is simple anymore, lol. deaths, storm surge windspeed, damage...good greif xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
49. ncforecaster
11:00 AM GMT on January 15, 2012
Quoting SPLbeater:


i will look at that, maybe i might buy it. my favorite hurricane story is Camille:D the worst hurricne the Atlantic has ever seen. some say katrina was worse, but some politics got in the way of releif there, and it was mostly levee faliure. Camille knocked out 90% of the levees, and the population was smaller then so technically, Camille and Katrina are atleast equal.

What are your thoughts on this


Hi SPL,

It's very difficult to make a definitive choice as to which "Atlantic" hurricane was the worst, per sey. In this case, I presume you are referring to the worst U.S. hurricane landfall, as opposed to the worst hurricane experienced anywhere within the Atlantic basin.

With the aforementioned in mind, there are various parameters one might use to categorize the "worst" storm. Based on intensity alone, it has to be the 1935 Great Labor Day hurricane (GLDH). If it's wind speed, one could make a reasonable argument for Camille, as well as the GLDH. If one uses total number of U.S. deaths, it has to be the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900. If it's based upon the largest known storm surge on a U.S. coastline, Katrina currently holds that record, with Camille a close second.

Even with the aforementioned parameters taken into consideration, one has to remember that some areas (such as the Mississippi coastal areas) are more prone to a large storm surge than others. These are just a few reasons as to why labeling one particular hurricane as the "worst" is so difficult and somewhat subjective.

In any respect, there is very little doubt that both H Camille and Katrina each deserve the distinction as being one of the "worst" U.S. hurricane landfalling storms of all time.

Thanks so much for the excellent post, and I hope you have a wonderful rest of the weekend!:)
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
48. SPLbeater
3:53 PM GMT on January 14, 2012
Quoting ncforecaster:


Hi SPL,

I agree that the book you mentioned is a fantastic read. There is an even newer book about the Great Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 called, "Hemmingway's Hurricane." It is another excellent account of this truly historic storm.


i will look at that, maybe i might buy it. my favorite hurricane story is Camille:D the worst hurricne the Atlantic has ever seen. some say katrina was worse, but some politics got in the way of releif there, and it was mostly levee faliure. Camille knocked out 90% of the levees, and the population was smaller then so technically, Camille and Katrina are atleast equal.

What are your thoughts on this
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
47. ncforecaster
7:57 AM GMT on January 14, 2012
Quoting sandiquiz:
Hi Tony,
Not been by your blog since Christmas... I do hope 2012 is a good year for you and your family, and the weather in your locale behaves this summer... you got plenty of storms last year to last a life time!


Hi Sandi!:) Thanks for the very thoughtful post. I hope the new year has been treating you well so far, and that it will only get better as the year progresses.

I hope you have a truly blessed rest of the weekend and I will look forward to talking with you again very soon!:)

Your friend,
Tony
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
46. sandiquiz
5:47 AM GMT on January 14, 2012
Hi Tony,
Not been by your blog since Christmas... I do hope 2012 is a good year for you and your family, and the weather in your locale behaves this summer... you got plenty of storms last year to last a life time!
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 300 Comments: 27061
45. ncforecaster
5:37 AM GMT on January 14, 2012
Quoting SPLbeater:


forgot about that one, lol. even tho i have the book of it 'Category 5; 1935 Labor Day Hurricane' lol. its a good book, if you dont have it i suggest readin it


Hi SPL,

I agree that the book you mentioned is a fantastic read. There is an even newer book about the Great Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 called, "Hemmingway's Hurricane." It is another excellent account of this truly historic storm.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
44. SPLbeater
5:44 PM GMT on January 13, 2012
Quoting petewxwatcher:
The 1935 Labor Day hurricane SPLbeater.


forgot about that one, lol. even tho i have the book of it 'Category 5; 1935 Labor Day Hurricane' lol. its a good book, if you dont have it i suggest readin it
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
43. ncforecaster
9:48 AM GMT on January 13, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1951-1960:

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

1) Storm #1 1951 May 17 TS 40 Kt (MH Able-offshore, SE Fl.)
2) Storm #8 1951 Oct 2 TS (How) 55 (SW Fl.)
2) Storm #8 1951 Oct 5 TS 45 (H How-offshore, Va.)
3) Storm #1 1952 Feb 2 TS 55 (SW Fl.)
4) Storm #3 1952 Aug 27 TS 50 (SC) #
5) Storm #1 1953 June 6 TS (Alice) 40 (NW Fl.)
6) Storm #3 1953 Aug 29 TS 35 (SW Fl.) ??
6) Storm #3 1953 Sep 1 TS 35 (Ga.)
7) Storm #7 1953 Sept 20 TS 35 (NW Fl.)
8) Storm #10 1953 Oct 3 TS 35 (TS-offshore, SE Fl.)
9) Storm #12 1953 Oct 9 TS/H (Hazel) 60/65 (SW Fl.) &
10) Storm #1 1954 June 25 TS (Alice) 40 (S TX.) *
11) Storm #2 1954 July 29 TS (Barbara) 35 (La.) ?
12) Storm #1 1955 Aug 1 TS (Brenda) 40 (La.)
13) Storm #5 1955 Aug 27 TS 40 (La.)
14) Storm #1 1956 June 13 TS 40 (La.)
15) Storm #1 1957 June 8 TS 35 (NW Fl.)
16) Storm #3 1957 Aug 9 TS (Bertha) 55 (La.)
17) Storm #5 1957 Sept 8 TS (Debbie) 35 (NW Fl.)
18) Storm #6 1957 Sept 18 TS (Esther) 50 (La.)
19) Storm #1 1958 June 15 TS (Alma) 35 (S TX.) *
20) Storm #4 1958 Aug 28/29 TS 35 (MH Daisy-offshore, NC, MA., RI.)
21) Storm #5 1958 Sept 6 TS (Ella) 40 (TX.)
22) Storm #1 1959 May 30 TS (Arlene) 40 (La.)
23) Storm #10 1959 Oct 8 TS (Irene) 40 (Al./NW Fl.)
24) Storm #11 1959 Oct 18 TS (Judith) 45 (SW Fl.)
25) Storm #1 1960 June 24 TS 40 (C TX.)
26) Storm #3 1960 July 28-31 TS (Brenda) 40-50 (NW Fl., NC to ME.)

? = signifies a higher degree of uncertainty regarding the prescribed intensity for these particular storms. Furthermore, the Monthly Weather Review (MWR) doesn't list any gale-force or TS-force winds for the tropical storm landfalls shown in HURDAT (or isn't retained in HURDAT preliminary reanalysis) for storm #3 of 1953 (its August landfall), and Storm #2 of 1954 (Barbara).

* = Designates a TS or H that made landfall in NE Mexico, but still brought TS conditions to south TX.

# = New storm discovered during HRD HURDAT preliminary reanalysis.

& = Storm #12 (Hazel) of 1953 has been reanalyzed as a possible 65 kt. category one H in the HRD preliminary reanalysis, while storm #4 (Carol) has been reanalyzed as a TS landfall in MA. and ME. in September (downgraded from its current category one landfall designation in HURDAT). If these changes are accepted in the future, these two respective storms would switch their current listings as a TS and H strike on the U.S. shoreline, respectively. For now, I am going to continue to categorize them as they currently appear in HURDAT.

Very Important Note: I am currently in the process of adding the approximate landfall intensity (and localities) for each respective TS strike that I have identified to have impacted some portion of the U.S. coastline with TS-force sustained winds, during the period of 1931-1982. Please note that I have already listed each one of these TS strikes in the decadal listing of all TS and H strikes that can be found in earlier posts contained in this particular blog entry.

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
42. ncforecaster
6:35 AM GMT on January 11, 2012
List of all known U.S. Tropical Storm strikes for the period of 1941-1950:

Note: This list doesn't include any tropical cyclones that made a TS landfall as well as a hurricane strike on the U.S. shoreline.

1) Storm #1 1941 Sept 14 TS 30-35 Kt. (TX.) ?
2) Storm #6 1941 Oct 20 TS 35 (NW Fl.)
3) Storm #8 1942 Oct 12 TD/TS 25-35 (NC) ??
4) Storm #6 1943 Sept 16/17 TS 45 (C, N TX.)
4) Storm #6 1943 Sept 19 TS 35 (La.)
5) Storm #7 1943 Sept 30 TS 50 (Va., MD.)
6) Storm #5 1944 Aug 22 TS 40 (S, TX.) *
7) Storm #6 1944 Sept 10 TS 50 (La., Al.)
8) Storm #7 1945 Sept 4 TS 40 (SW Fl.)
9) Storm #1 1946 June 16 TD/TS 30/35 (TX.) ??
10) Storm #2 1946 July 6 TS 40 (NC)
11) Storm #7 1946 Nov 1 TS 40 (SE, Fl.)
12) Storm #8 1946 Nov 3 TS 35 (NC) #
13) Storm #1 1947 Aug 1 35 (S TX.) *
14) Storm #5 1947 Sept 8 TS 45 (Al.)
15) Storm #6 1947 Sept 23 TS 55 (NW Fl.)
16) Storm #7 1947 Oct 6 TS 50 (Ga.)
17) Storm #2 1948 July 9 TS 35 (NW Fl.)
18) Storm #5 1949 Sept 4 TS 50 (La.)
19) Storm #7 1949 Sept 13 TS 35 (NC) #
20) Storm #1 1950 Aug 19/20 40 (MH Able-offshore, NC, MA.) ??
21) Storm #4 1950 Sept 11 TS 35 (H Dog-offshore, NC)
21) Storm #4 1950 Sept 12 TS 45 (H Dog-offshore, MA.) ?
22) Storm #13 1950 Oct 21 TS (Love) 60 (NW, Fl.)

? = signifies a higher degree of uncertainty regarding the prescribed intensity for these particular storms. Furthermore, the Monthly Weather Review (MWR) doesn't list any gale-force or TS-force winds for the tropical storm landfalls shown in HURDAT (or isn't retained in HURDAT preliminary reanalysis) for storm #1 of 1941, storm #8 of 1942, storm #1 of 1946, and storm #1 of 1950. Consequently, it's uncertain whether any of these TS landfalls will be retained in HURDAT once the HRD reanalysis is complete for these particular storms.

* = Designates a TS or H that made landfall in NE Mexico, but still brought TS conditions to south TX.

# = New storm discovered during HRD HURDAT preliminary reanalysis.

Very Important Note: I am currently in the process of adding the approximate landfall intensity (and localities) for each respective TS strike that I have identified to have impacted some portion of the U.S. coastline with TS-force sustained winds, during the period of 1931-1982. Please note that I have already listed each one of these TS strikes in the decadal listing of all TS and H strikes that can be found in earlier posts contained in this particular blog entry.
Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374
41. ncforecaster
10:13 PM GMT on December 23, 2011
Hi Sandi,

Thank you so much for the very thoughtful "Christmas" post!:) It is always great to hear from you and I hope you and yours are each doing well on the other side of the Atlantic.

I too want to wish you the most wonderful and truly blessed Christmas imaginable and I look forward to talking with you again soon!:)

Your friend,
Tony

Member Since: May 17, 2006 Posts: 108 Comments: 1374

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